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Marietta in Cobb County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Kolb's Farm - June 22, 1864

 
 
National Park Service sign describing the Battle of Kolb's Farm image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert
1. National Park Service sign describing the Battle of Kolb's Farm
Inscription. A costly Confederate attack here stopped the Union army's attempt to bypass Kennesaw Mountain.

On June 22, 1864, Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston sent Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood's 13,000 troops down Powder Springs Road to stop the Federal army's threat to his flank. When Confederate skirmishers encountered Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker's 11,000-man Union corps here at Kolb's farm, Hood ordered his troops to attack.

Hooker, having learned of Hood's plans from some captured Confederates, ordered his troops to dig in. At 4:00 p.m. Hood sent two of his three divisions toward the waiting Federals. After several unsuccessful charges through the woods, fields, and swamps across the road, the battered Confederates withdrew.
 
Erected by Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park - National Park Service.
 
Location. 33° 54.635′ N, 84° 35.808′ W. Marker is in Marietta, Georgia, in Cobb County. Marker is on Callaway Road SW near Powder Springs Road SW (Georgia Route 360), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Marietta GA 30008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Kolb's Farm (here, next to this marker); a different marker
Battle of Kolb's Farm - June 22, 1864 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, October 11, 2008
2. Battle of Kolb's Farm - June 22, 1864 Marker
also named Battle of Kolb's Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); Kolb House (within shouting distance of this marker); Wm. G. McAdoo's Birthplace (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Kolb's Farm (approx. half a mile away); Historic Dickson House (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Kolb’s Farm (approx. 0.8 miles away); Powder Springs Road (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Marietta.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is an illustration depicting "General Hooker Questioning Confederate Prisoners" outside Peter Valentine Kolb's pioneer log house -- the only surviving Civil War-period structure within Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park.

To the right is a map showing the tactical situation described on the map. The Battle of Kolb's Farm cost Hood's Confederates more than 1,000 killed, wounded, or missing soldiers while inflicting fewer than 300 casualties on the Federals. However, the bloody assault temporarily stopped
Battle of Kolb's Farm - June 22, 1864 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, October 11, 2008
3. Battle of Kolb's Farm - June 22, 1864 Marker
Union Maj. William T. Sherman's flanking move and contributed to his decision to attack Kennesaw Mountain five days later on June 27.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Battle of Kolb's Farm Markers in 2015 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 25, 2015
4. Battle of Kolb's Farm Markers in 2015
Battle of Kolb's Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert
5. Battle of Kolb's Farm Marker
To the left is the post for the missing Battle of Kolb's Farm Marker 033-12. In the center is a National Park Service sign describing the actions during the battle.
The Kolb Farm House image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert
6. The Kolb Farm House
The house is owned and has been restored by the National Park Service. It is the only surviving Civil War-era structure in the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park.
Kolb House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, October 11, 2008
7. Kolb House Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 2,553 times since then and 159 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2, 3. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   4. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   5, 6. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   7. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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