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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Poinsett's Spring

 
 
Poinsett's Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 22, 2009
1. Poinsett's Spring Marker
Inscription.
This park was given to the county of Greenville in 1788 by
Lemuel J. Alston
The Poinsett-Spring-Stones given in 1956 by the heirs of
C.C. Hindman
to the Poinsett Hotel,
J. Mason Alexander, Mng. Dir.

 
Erected 1956 by Heirs of C.C. Hindman.
 
Location. 34° 50.933′ N, 82° 23.983′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is at the intersection of East Court Street and South Main Street, on the left when traveling west on East Court Street. Click for map. Marker is attached to the back of the Poinsett's Springs Fountain. Marker is in this post office area: Greenville SC 29602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Vardry McBee (a few steps from this marker); Joel Roberts Poinsett (a few steps from this marker); The Old Record Building (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Joel Roberts Poinsett (within shouting distance of this marker); South Carolina's First National Bank (within shouting distance of this marker); Chamber of Commerce Building
Poinsett's Spring Fountain<br>Former Location image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 22, 2009
2. Poinsett's Spring Fountain
Former Location
The letters across the top stand for Joel Roberts Poinsett. The date is 1820.
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named South Carolina's First National Bank (within shouting distance of this marker); Greenville County Courthouse / The Willie Earle Lynching Trial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Spirit of Freedom (about 300 feet away); City of Greenville 9-11 Plaque (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Greenville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lemuel J. Alston. Lemuel James Alston (1760 - 1836) was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina. (Submitted on March 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Poinsett Hotel. The Poinsett Hotel was one of the first skyscrapers to be constructed in Greenville. (Submitted on March 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Lemuel J. Alston (1760 - 1836)
Alston, Lemuel James, a Representative from South Carolina; born in the eastern part of Granville (now Warren) County, N.C., in 1760; moved to South Carolina after the Revolutionary War and settled near Greens Mill, which soon became the town of Greenville;
Poinsett's Spring Fountain -<br>Current Location image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 19, 2010
3. Poinsett's Spring Fountain -
Current Location
studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Greenville; member of the State house of representatives, 1789-1790; elected as a Republican to the Tenth and Eleventh Congresses (March 4, 1807-March 3, 1811); moved in 1816 to Clarke County, Ala., and settled near Grove Hill, where he presided over the orphansí court and the county court from November 1816 until May 1821; died at “Alston Place,” Clarke County, Ala., in 1836. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted March 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Joel Robert Poinsett
Itís widely known that Joel Poinsett was the first ambassador to Mexico, a position he held for five years, but he also served as the first consul-general of the United States to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Santiago, Chile. He studied medicine and law, and not surprisingly was extremely well traveled, but he also had interests in natural history, science, and politics.

While serving in the South Carolina legislature, Poinsett was appointed president of the board of public works from 1819 to 1821, a position that had him overseeing construction of the state road that traversed Saluda Mountain. This road (modern-day S.C. Secondary Road 42) ran from Charleston, through Columbia,
Poinsett's Spring Fountain<br>Former Location image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 4, 2010
4. Poinsett's Spring Fountain
Former Location
and into North Carolina, creating a seamless connector capable of accommodating even the “heaviest load,” in place of several inefficient roads already in existence. Not surprisingly, more than twenty years later, he would join McBee and others to support connecting Columbia and Greenville by rail. (Source: G: The Magazine of Greenville, Jan/Feb 09, pg 68.)
    — Submitted March 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Poinsett Hotel image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Poinsett Hotel
From the National Register nomination form: "The hotel featured a ballroom, a convention hall, a main dining room, private dining rooms, a grill room, a lounge, eight to ten shops and stores, and 210 guest rooms, each with a private bath. Listed in the National Register July 1, 1982."
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 929 times since then and 65 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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