Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Williamsburg in James City County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Efforts to Build a Town 1660-1699

 
 
Efforts to Build a Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 14, 2008
1. Efforts to Build a Town Marker
Inscription. The foundations of the multi-dwelling structure that stood here match the dimensions called for in legislation passed by the General Assembly in September 1662.

This row rouse was standing by September 1668 when the justices of James City County asked permission to use “one of the Countrie Brick houses” as a prison. A man’s pelvis and left leg excavated from an abandoned well just north of “that house where the goale kept,” may be gruesome evidence of a drawn-and-quartered lawbreaker.

The two eastern units, badly damaged during Bacon’s Rebellion and “lyeing in ruins,” were repaired and altered shortly after 1680. George Lee and his wife Sarah occupied a unit at the east end and provided accommodations to committees of the assembly, the General Court, and delegations of Virginia Indians in town on official business. The row was abandoned soon after the capital moved to Williamsburg in 1699.

That the towne to be built shall consist of thirty two houses,
each house to be built with brick, forty foot long, twenty foot wide . . . .

The Town Act of 1662

 
Erected by Colonial National Historic Park.
 
Location. 37° 12.516′ N, 76° 46.549′ 
Marker in Historic Jamestowne image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 14, 2008
2. Marker in Historic Jamestowne
W. Marker is near Williamsburg, Virginia, in James City County. Marker can be reached from Colonial Parkway, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in the "New Towne" section of the Historic Jamestown unit of Colonial National Historic Park. Marker is in this post office area: Williamsburg VA 23185, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Inside a Home (a few steps from this marker); Tradesmen on Governor Harvey’s Lot 1630s (within shouting distance of this marker); Gardens and Crops (within shouting distance of this marker); Oyster Shells to Mortar (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Ditch and Mound (about 300 feet away); A Place of Work (about 400 feet away); Swann’s Tavern 1670s (about 400 feet away); Iron and Industry (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Williamsburg.
 
More about this marker. The upper right of the marker contains a picture of a Jamestown row house, by Sidney King, ca. 1957. The left side of the marker features a map of a Jamestown rowhouse, a photograph of Row house excavation, ca. 1930s, and a picture of “Earthenware roofing tiles made at Jamestown [which] demonstrate the shift to a more permanent building form of construction.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Historic Jamestowne.
Row House Foundations image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 14, 2008
3. Row House Foundations
The foundations of a 1668 structure are located behind the marker.
Colonial National Historic Park from National Park Service website. (Submitted on March 24, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Historic Jamestowne. Historic Jamestowne is the site of the first permanent English settlement in America. The site is jointly administered by APVA Preservation Virginia and the National Park Service. (Submitted on March 24, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Colonial Era
 
Jamestown Marker and Foundations image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 14, 2008
4. Jamestown Marker and Foundations
The marker can be seen to the left of this photo, in front of the rowhouse foundations.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 620 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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