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Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Memorial To The American Revolution

Battlefield Memorial Park

 
 
Memorial To The American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 26, 2009
1. Memorial To The American Revolution Marker
Inscription. To Arms !

The 800 stones before you have three meanings:
They represent the approximate number of soldiers killed or wounded in Savannah on the foggy morning of October 9, 1779.
The stones are arranged as a column, with ten soldiers across. The French and American allies formed five such columns of men to attack the fortified British.
Inscribed on the stones are the names and stories of people throughout the entire Revolutionary struggle from all the states, countries and cultures involved.

To your left stands a granite marker identifying the location of the Spring Hill redoubt, one of 14 British earth fortifications surrounding Savannah in 1779. It was here that the thousands in the French and other allied American columns tried to smash through the hundreds of British and loyalists defending this area.
The allied columns were meant to attack simultaneously, in overwhelming force. Due to poor communication, they arrived separately, disoriented and tired from hours of marching in the dark woods. With volunteers leading each column up the foggy slope, the soldiers attacked with fixed bayonets.
As the columns advanced, artillery and small arms crossfire killed and maimed commanders and private soldiers alike. The redoubt
Marker's upper picture ; British Plan of the Seige of Savannah image. Click for full size.
Memorial To The American Revolution Marker
2. Marker's upper picture ; British Plan of the Seige of Savannah
This British battle map shows the defenses around Savannah.
became a scene of hand-to-hand combat with swords and bayonets clashing.
Families from Virginia to the Carolinas, from Poland to Scotland, from France to Haiti, from Germany to England would morn the loss and suffering of loved ones who spilled their blood on the ground surrounding the Spring Hill redoubt.
 
Erected 2008 by The City of Savannah, Sons of the Revolution in the State of Georgia.
 
Location. 32° 4.559′ N, 81° 6.048′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on Martin Luther King Blvd. ( West Broad St. ). Click for map. Between Louisville Rd. W. Harris St. (Between Savannah Visitor Center and Savannah Roundhouse Museum ). Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Clymer (a few steps from this marker); Isidore De Lynch (a few steps from this marker); Mills Murphree (a few steps from this marker); To Honor Our Patriot Ancestors (a few steps from this marker); Peter Tondee (a few steps from this marker); Major General Israel Putnam (a few steps from this marker); Richard Wall (a few steps from this marker); Samuel Elbert (a few steps from this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Savannah.
 
Also see . . .
Memorial To The American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2013
3. Memorial To The American Revolution Marker
 Revolutionary War remnants unearthed near downtown Savannah. Associated Press....The city bought the Battlefield Park site from the Norfolk Southern railroad (Submitted on March 28, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Lower picture image. Click for full size.
Memorial To The American Revolution Marker
4. Lower picture
The inset map shows the British defences and the paths of the attacking French and American Columns.
Memorial To The American Revolution Stone Markers as mentioned image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 16, 2008
5. Memorial To The American Revolution Stone Markers as mentioned
Memorial To The American Revolution Stone and others image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 22, 2008
6. Memorial To The American Revolution Stone and others
Alexander MacDonald 1760-1833 42nd Regiment of Foote " The Black Watch " 1776- 1783
Ezra Perry 1741-1821 12th Massachusetts Regiment Continental Line Nov 1776 - Jan 1781

Cpt. Abraham Sheppard Lane 1757 - 1848 He served a total of 84 months in the Continental Line and in the North Carolina Militia, rising to the rank of captain. He was wounded in the arm at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, NC. Lane is buried in the Abraham Sheppard Lane Cemetery in Jenkins County Georgia.

Henry Pool 1759 - 1852 Henry and his father were patriots in the struggle for independence. He fought in Georgia and South Carolina campaigns and was present at Yorktown when Cornwallis surrendered. The D.A.R. erected a tombstone on his grave in Warren County, Ga and placed his war-torn Bible at the D.A.R. Museum in Washington, D.C.
Memorial To The American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 2009
7. Memorial To The American Revolution Marker
William Jackson 1759 - 1828 Of English birth, orphaned William was sent to Charleston, SC. He enlisted in the 1st SC Regiment. Lieutenant Jackson fought at Steno Ferry and Savannah, was captured at Charleston and paroled. As an aide he served with Gen. Washington and in France. He served as secretary to the Constitutional Convention and became Assistant Secretary of War.

Johann Ewald Born in Hesse Kassel of common parentage. He became a professional soldier and noted military aurthor. He commanded Jaeger Troops in America from 1776 to wars end Denied advancement in Hesse Kassel, he eventually became a Danish Lt. General and Nobleman.

Bernardo deGalvez 1746 -1786 Born in Spain, at age 16 he fought in Portugal, then against the Apaches in New Spain, then in Algeria. As Governor of Louisiana after Spain's declartion of war June 29 1779, he fought British forces at Manchac, Baton Rouge, Natchez, Mobile and the Bahamas. Promoted to Viceroy of New Spain, he died in 1786 at age 40.

Esther De Berdt Reed 1746 - 1780 Esther was born in London of Huguenot ancestry, married to Philadelphian Joseph Reed, she came to America. Joseph served with Washington, then became President of Pennsylvania. As state's First Lady, Esther organized woman in a major fundraising campaign to provide relief for soldiers. Amid this effort she died at age 34.
Some of the Memorial stones image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 2008
8. Some of the Memorial stones
Maria Magdelena Bellinger Born in 1725, Maria was raised in the Palatine German settlements of upstate New York. Maria's husband of 33 years, Johannes, and her grown sons John and Frederick were all killed in the Battle of Oriskany, New York, Aug 6, 1777

Jonathan Bryan 1708 - 1788 Born in South Carolina, in 1733 Bryan helped to establish the colony of Georgia. In a skirmish on May 21, 1782 Bryan, now 74 years old, fought with the American Forces and showed as much fire and spirit as a young soldier in the pursuit of military fame. Bryan County, Ga is named in his honor.

Lt. John Moore 1735 - 1797 Lieutenant in the 7th Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line. Enlisted in Eli Ely's Company in 1775.

Margaret Cochran Corbin 1751 - 1800 While under attack, Margaret's husband John took charge of a cannon after the gunner was killed and Margaret assisted him. John was killed also. Margaret continued firing until she was wounded. She was left without the use of her left arm for the rest of her life. In 1779 she was granted a half pension due to her bravery ( battle at Fort Washington, New York )
Memorial To The American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 2009
9. Memorial To The American Revolution Marker
Magnus Tulloch A native of Orkney, Scotland, Mangus enlisted in South Carolina as a Fifer at age 13. He served five years and was in the Battles of Stono Ferry, Savannah, Kings Mountain, and the Siege of Ninety Six.

Sgt. William Jasper 2nd South Carolina A daring and bold soldier, Sgt. Jasper distinguished himself at Fort Moultrie in June 1776. His deeds leading small units became legends. He died carrying his regiment's flag to the parapet of the British fortications at Spring Hill during the Battle of Savannah October 9, 1779.
Spring Hill Redoubt Marker as mentioned. image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 2008
10. Spring Hill Redoubt Marker as mentioned.
See nearby markers
Memorial To The American Revolution at Battlefield Park, Savannh image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 16, 2008
11. Memorial To The American Revolution at Battlefield Park, Savannh
" In Memory of Those Who Fought Here "
The Park's replica of the Spring Hill Redoubt image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 16, 2008
12. The Park's replica of the Spring Hill Redoubt
"This is Memorial To The American Revolution "Marker and Sponsers image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
13. "This is Memorial To The American Revolution "Marker and Sponsers
Memorial To The American Revolution ground Marker, stones and flagpole image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
14. Memorial To The American Revolution ground Marker, stones and flagpole
Memorial To The American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 5, 2012
15. Memorial To The American Revolution Marker
A. Jackson
Memorial To The American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 5, 2012
16. Memorial To The American Revolution Marker
Brig. General Francis Marion
Memorial To The American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 5, 2012
17. Memorial To The American Revolution Marker
Sgt. William Jasper
 
 
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