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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Albany in Franklin County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Disposal of Land in Plain Township

 
 
Disposal of Land in Plain Township Marker (Side A) Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., March 8, 2009
1. Disposal of Land in Plain Township Marker (Side A)
Inscription. Side A:
Because three distinct survey methods were used to survey Plain Township lands and are still meaningful, the township can be thought of as a surveyor's museum. The township came into existence by a 1796 act of Congress in which the federal government established a Military District of Ohio to satisfy the claims of Revolutionary War veterans. The act divided the district into townships five miles square divided into four quarter-sections containing 4,000 acres each. These boundaries were surveyed in 1797 after the Battle of Fallen Timbers and the subsequent Treaty of Greenville, which forced Indian removal. Because a veteran was entitled to 100 acres, the southeast quarter of the township was surveyed into 40 hundred-acre lots. From 1801 to 1805, veterans, their heirs, and assignees, none of whom settled permanently in the township, claimed 24 lots. Abijah Holbrook, a land speculator, acquired veterans' warrants for the remaining sixteen. (Continued on other side)

Side B:
(Continued from other side)
In 1800, Dudley Woodbridge acquired sufficient veterans' warrants and purchased the entire southwest quarter of the township from the federal government. He sold it two years later to John Huffman for 4,000 gallons of whiskey. Over the next twenty years Huffman then sold off much of that land in “metes
Disposal of Land in Plain Township Marker (Side B) Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., March 8, 2009
2. Disposal of Land in Plain Township Marker (Side B)
and bounds” parcels, meaning that the land was surveyed somewhat haphazardly by direction, distance, and sometimes description of landmarks such as rocks and trees. In 1810, civilian governance began under the name Plain Township. In 1812, the federal government sold the unclaimed land in the northern half of the township for $2.00 an acre, surveying it, in accordance with an act of 1803, into mile-square, 640-acre sections, a measurement used in the disposition of public lands across the country. The exact center of Plain Township lies on the north boundary of the Swickard Woods Park.
 
Erected 2003 by New Albany Plain Township Historical Society, Bob Evans Farms, New Albany Community Foundation, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 61-25.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 5.337′ N, 82° 49.081′ W. Marker is in New Albany, Ohio, in Franklin County. Marker is on Swickard Woods Boulevard, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in parking area 100 feet SW of water park in Swickard Woods Community Park, about 600 feet NNW of intersection of Swickard Woods Blvd and Fodor Road. Marker is in this post office area: New Albany OH 43054, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Disposal of Land in Plain Township Marker Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., March 8, 2009
3. Disposal of Land in Plain Township Marker
Swickard Woods Community Park in background.
At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. George and Christina Ealy House and Land (approx. half a mile away); The Sylvester Ranney House (approx. 0.7 miles away); Founders of New Albany (approx. 0.7 miles away); New Albany and Plain Township Veterans and First Responders Memorial (approx. 0.7 miles away); Wagnor Cemetery (approx. one mile away); Archibald's Mill (approx. 1.9 miles away); Smith’s Burying Ground : Pioneer Cemetery (approx. 2.4 miles away); Central College Presbyterian Church (approx. 3.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in New Albany.
 
Categories. GovernmentMilitaryNative AmericansNatural ResourcesPatriots & PatriotismPolitical SubdivisionsSettlements & SettlersWar, US RevolutionaryWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas. This page has been viewed 808 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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