Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

End of the Second Day

July 2, 1863 - Second Day

 
 
End of the Second Day Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
1. End of the Second Day Marker
Inscription. "The great Rebel assault, the greatest ever made upon this continent, had been made and signally repulsed...."
1st Lt. Frank A. Haskell, U.S.A.
Aide to Brig. Gen. John Gibbon.

When the Union position at the Peach Orchard (1/2 mile to your right) collapsed on the afternoon of July 2, a Confederate victory seemed imminent. The Union left was giving way. Wounded and retreating Federals streamed eastward (to your left) to seek field hospitals or lost regiments.

General Meade, the Union commander, rushed reinforcements to this area, hoping to prevent a rout. Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock directed the fresh Union troops to critical positions. Lt. Col. Freeman McGilvery assembled artillery batteries along the ridge to your left and right to impede the attackers. Near here Union marksmen shot down Confederate Brig. Gen. William Barksdale, the hard-driving Mississippian. The Confederate attack lost momentum.

The immediate crisis over, General Meade reassured his men, "...it is all right now." That night the Union army strengthened its line from the Round Tops north to Cemetery Hill and Culp's Hill. The day's fighting had reaped a harvest of nearly 20,000 dead, wounded, and missing. The following day General Lee would attack once more.

(Key to Panorama in the Upper Center and Right):
You are now standing
LIttle Round Top with telephoto lens equivalent to typical field binoculars Photo, Click for full size
By Henry T. McLin, August 9, 2011
2. LIttle Round Top with telephoto lens equivalent to typical field binoculars
Visitors to Little Round Top Monument
on United States Avenue looking south down the Plum Run Valley.

(1) Little Round Top
On the afternoon of July 2 Union troops reached this strategic high ground just in time to defend it from Longstreet's attacking Confederates.

(2) Big Round Top
On the afternoon of July 2 Confederates of Hood's Division occupied the summit, but were driven off that night by Union infantry. Big Round Top became the southern anchor of the Union line.

(3) Plum Run Valley
Also called "Valley of Death." On the night of July 2 Union troops occupied the high ground on the left side of the valley, opposed by Confederate skirmishers on the right sided. In the "no man's land" between the armies, the wounded cried for help in the dark.
 
Erected by Gettysburg National Military Park.
 
Location. 39° 48.114′ N, 77° 14.35′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on United States Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located near the Trostle Farm in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battery I, Fifth U.S. Artillery (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); 39th New York Infantry
End of the Second Day Wayside Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
3. End of the Second Day Wayside
(about 500 feet away); 150th New York Infantry (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ninth Massachusetts Battery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Major General Sickles (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bigelow's Desperate Stand (approx. 0.2 miles away); 3d Corps Headquarters (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battery G, 1st New York Light Artillery (approx. mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. In the upper center and right is a panoramic view, looking south, of the valley. In the lower center is a painting depicting some of the action near the close of the Second Day. Brig. Gen. Samuel W. Crawford leads the Pennsylvania Reserves against attacking Confederates in the Plum Run Valley on the afternoon of July 2. Painting by Dale Gallon.

On the right is a portrait of Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, commander of the Union Second Corps, helped stabilize the Union position here after the fall of the Peach Orchard line on July 2. On July 3, as his men repulsed Pickett's Charge, he was severely wounded. After the war, in 1880, he was nearly
Panoramic View of Plum Run Valley Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain
4. Panoramic View of Plum Run Valley
Looking south from the tablet location. The key points mentioned on the marker are indicated here.
elected President of the United States losing the election to James A. Garfield.

 
Also see . . .
1. The Trostle Farm. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on March 29, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Haskell's Account of the Battle of Gettysburg. Lt. Haskell wrote this account of the battle, from which the leading quote is taken. (Submitted on March 29, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Federal Center and McGilvery's Line Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
5. Federal Center and McGilvery's Line
Looking from the Trostle Farm east toward Cemetery Ridge. Almost center of the view is the New York Auxiliary Memorial on Hancock Avenue, on top of the ridge. McGilvery, as mentioned on the marker, placed his surviving artillery, and any additional reinforcements he could bring in, along the high ground overlooking Plum Run.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 822 times since then and 83 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Henry T. McLin of Hanover, Pennsylvania.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement