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Near Blacksburg in York County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

God Save the King!

 
 
God Save the King! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 29, 2009
1. God Save the King! Marker
Inscription.
A battalion of loyal Americans stood battle-ready on the spine of Kings Mountain above you. Lord Cornwallis' powerful army had ground its way north from Charleston with an unbroken string of British victories. Throughout the summer of 1780, His Majesty's Inspector of Militia, Major Patrick Ferguson, had successfully convinced thousands of Carolina men to take up arms to defend the government under which they had been born and raised. Now Ferguson and 1,000 loyalists - one third of the King's army south of New York - had taken their stand on this ridge, primed to finish off the rebels gathering around them.

In the background of the marker are depictions of the Tory soldiers.

Most of the Tories who fought here came from the Carolinas. Just like the Whigs, they had no military uniforms. A green sprig of pine in their hats was their only identification.

Loyalists militia trained long hours to master handling Brown Bess muskets. Like their redcoat instructors, they expected their bayonets to carry the day on any battlefield.

Nine-tenths of Ferguson's force here were Carolina Tories.

Only about 120 provincial soldiers wore the redcoat here. These troops were men from Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey who had joined the British army early in the war.

 
Erected by
Where the Tories Came From image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 14, 2010
2. Where the Tories Came From
National Park Service.
 
Location. 35° 8.494′ N, 81° 22.636′ W. Marker is near Blacksburg, South Carolina, in York County. Marker can be reached from Kings Mountain Park Road, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located along a 1.5 mile walking trail around the Kings Mountain Battlefield, northwest of the museum's rear entrance. Marker is in this post office area: Blacksburg SC 29702, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Liberty! (here, next to this marker); Carolina Backwoodsmen (a few steps from this marker); Americans Vanquished (within shouting distance of this marker); Americans Victors (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Two Parks, One Mountain (about 300 feet away); Kings Mountain Battlefild Trail (about 400 feet away); Fighting in a Forest Primeval (about 400 feet away); Major Winston's (about 500 feet away); Colonel Patrick Ferguson Memorial (about 700 feet away); Col. Ferguson Fell (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Blacksburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of King's Mountain - Sons of the American Revolution. Many historians consider the Battle of Kings Mountain on October 7, 1780 to be the turning point in America's War for Independence. (Submitted on April 1, 2009, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
Map Showing the Origin of the Tory Militia image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 29, 2009
3. Map Showing the Origin of the Tory Militia
 

2. Kings Mountain National Military Park (U.S. National Park Service). Thomas Jefferson called it "The turn of the tide of success." (Submitted on September 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Kings Mountain National Military Park. Kings Mountain National Military Park is a National Military Park near Blacksburg, South Carolina, along the North Carolina/South Carolina border. (Submitted on September 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Kings Mountain National Military Park. The Battle at Kings Mountain, fought between British loyalist forces and American patriots on October 7, 1780, ended a string of British successes in the Carolinas and Georgia. (Submitted on September 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis. Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis KG (31 December 1738 – 5 October 1805), styled Viscount Brome between 1753 and 1762 and known as The Earl Cornwallis between 1762 and 1792, was a British Army officer and colonial administrator. (Submitted on September 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Patrick Ferguson. Major Patrick Ferguson (1744 – October 7, 1780) was a Scottish officer in the British Army, early advocate of light infantry and designer of the Ferguson rifle. (Submitted on September 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
God Save the King! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 14, 2010
4. God Save the King! Marker
 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
God Save the King! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2010
5. God Save the King! Marker
God Save the King! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 14, 2010
6. God Save the King! Marker
Charles Cornwallis, First Marquis of Cornwallis<br>(1738 - 1805) image. Click for full size.
By John Singleton Copley, circa 1795
7. Charles Cornwallis, First Marquis of Cornwallis
(1738 - 1805)
Major Patrick Ferguson<br>(1744–1780) image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia, circa 1775
8. Major Patrick Ferguson
(1744–1780)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 738 times since then and 53 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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