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The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Paul Jones Memorial

National Mall & Memorial Parks, Washington, D.C.

 
 
John Paul Jones Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 8, 2009
1. John Paul Jones Memorial Marker
Inscription. "Every officer in our navy should know by heart the deeds of John Paul Jones," President Theodore Roosevelt.

The American Revolution

[Portrait of] John Paul Jones, 1747-1742

A bold captain--fearless even when facing the superior British Royal Navy--John Paul Jones ensured his place in American memory.
Jones, a recent Scottish immigrant, readily accepted an appointment in the new Continental Navy following the start of the American Revolution. He captained several ships during the war and became a celebrated hero. Jones' voyage to fame became a familiar story to immigrants who succeeded through personal achievement instead of inherited right of birth.

In 1779 while captaining the Bonhomme Richard, Jones captured the H.M.S. Serapis during a spectacular and bloody engagement fought within view of the British shore. Dubbed "the pirate, Paul Jones," Jones's exploits reminded British citizens they were not immune from the effects of war. Perhaps Jones' greatest contribution toward American independence was that he became a hero precisely when the cause needed one.

The Memorial

On April 17, 1912, President William Howard Taft dedicated this memorial. Jones is depicted standing defiantly upon the deck of the Bonhomme Richard during battle and
John Paul Jones Memorial and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 8, 2009
2. John Paul Jones Memorial and Marker
is surrounded by nautical symbols and fountains. Jones' memorial honors someone who exemplified bravery, heroism, and devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds.

[The marker's background painting is a depiction of "Action Between the Serapis and Bonhomme Richard" by Richard Paton, published 1780.]
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 53.31′ N, 77° 2.354′ W. Marker is in The National Mall, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 17th Street, SW and Independence Avenue, SW, on the right when traveling north on 17th Street, SW. Click for map. Marker is accessible to pedestrians from the sidewalk at the intersection, on the northeast corner, off the transition lane from Independence Avenue to 17th Street. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named John Paul Jones Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); World War II Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Why is the Washington Monument Temporarily Closed?
John Paul Jones image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 31, 2015
3. John Paul Jones
Close-up of image on marker
(about 500 feet away); Keeping the Cherry Trees Healthy (about 800 feet away); Japanese Stone Lantern - Lighting the Way (approx. 0.2 miles away); Japanese Stone Lantern (approx. 0.2 miles away but has been reported missing); A Symbol of International Friendship (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in The National Mall.
 
Categories. HeroesNotable EventsNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US RevolutionaryWaterways & Vessels
 
John Paul Jones image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 31, 2015
4. John Paul Jones
1911 Sculpture by Charles H. Niehaus
Dolphin Fountain image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 31, 2015
5. Dolphin Fountain
on the John Paul Jones Memorial
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,991 times since then and 333 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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