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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Midland in Fauquier County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Marshall’s Birthplace

 
 
John Marshall's Birthplace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, March 3, 2007
1. John Marshall's Birthplace Marker
Inscription. About one half mile southeast, just across the railroad, a stone marks the site of the birthplace, September 24, 1755. He died at Philadelphia, July 6, 1835. Revolutionary office, Congressman, Secretary of State, he is immortal as Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. During his long term of office his wise interpretation of the U. S. Constitution gave it enduring life.
 
Erected 1950 by Virginia Convservation Commission. (Marker Number CL 3.)
 
Location. 38° 36.378′ N, 77° 43.033′ W. Marker is near Midland, Virginia, in Fauquier County. Marker is on Catlett Road (Virginia Route 28) 0.1 miles south of Smith Midland Lane, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Midland VA 22728, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John Marshall’s Birthplace Park (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named John Marshall’s Birthplace (approx. 0.4 miles away); German Town (approx. 1.5 miles away); Elk Run Village (approx. 4.4 miles away); Elk Run Anglican Church Site
Wider view of John Marshall's Birthplace marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, March 3, 2007
2. Wider view of John Marshall's Birthplace marker
(approx. 4.4 miles away); Stuart and Mosby (approx. 4.7 miles away); Catlett’s Station (approx. 5.3 miles away); Mosby’s Raid at Catlett’s Station (approx. 5.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Midland.
 
Also see . . .  From Revolution to Reconstruction, Biographies, John Marshall. (Submitted on July 19, 2007, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.)
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
The Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin White, August 30, 2007
3. The Stone Marker
About one half mile southeast, just across the railroad, a stone pyramid marks the site of the birthplace...
John Marshall image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
4. John Marshall
This 1809–10 portrait of John Marshall by Cephus Thompson hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“John Marshall, the fourth chief justice of the United States, established the concept of judicial review — in which the Supreme Court could pronounce a law of Congress as unconstitutional — and strengthened the idea of an independent federal judiciary. In cases brought to the Court between 1810 and 1824 — years in which the Marshall Court enjoyed great stability and harmony — Marshall used the Court's judicial review to nullify state laws violating constitutional restraints of state power. The effect of Marshall's long tenure as chief justice (1801-35) was to strengthen the Court, the Constitution, and the federal government. The Court became a preeminent interpreter of the Constitution, and the federal government's enumerated powers were given a broad interpretation and made superior to those of the states.

Cephas Thompson painted a portrait of Marshall from life in Richmond, as well as six replicas for admirers, two years after Marshall presided at the trial of Aaron Burr for treason.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 1,274 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.   3. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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