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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

118th Pennsylvania Volunteers

Corn Exchange Regiment

 

1st Brigade, 1st Division, 5th Corps

 
118th Pennsylvania Volunteers Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
1. 118th Pennsylvania Volunteers Monument
The monument stands on a boulder outcropping on Big Round Top.
Inscription. (Front):
118th Penna. Vol's
Corn Exchange Reg't
1st Brigade 1st Division 5th Corps
Army of the Potomac

(Left):
Engaged in advance
of "Wheat Field" July 2,
and held this position
July 3, and 4, 1863.

(Back):
Mustered into service
August 30, 1862
Mustered out June 1, 1865
Participated in 34 battles
Killed in battle 205
Died of wounds and disease 500
Missing in action 273
Original muster 960
Recruits 456
Final muster of original members 139.

(Right):
Erected in their honor
by the Commercial Exchange
formerly Corn Exchange
of Philadelphia, and the
surviving members of
the Regiment.

 
Erected 1884 by the Commercial Exchange of Philadelphia.
 
Location. 39° 47.243′ N, 77° 14.332′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker can be reached from South Confederate Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located on a trail to the crest of Big Round Top in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 119th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers
Front of Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
2. Front of Monument
The regimental designation appears on a knapsack crowning the monument. The center displays a Maltese Cross for the Fifth Corps embraced by a wreath of corn stalks.
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 20th Maine Regiment (about 300 feet away); 5th Pennsylvania Reserves (about 300 feet away); 12th Pennsylvania Reserves (about 400 feet away); 9th Massachusetts Infantry (about 500 feet away); Third Brigade (about 500 feet away); 10th Pennsylvania Reserves (about 600 feet away); Law's Brigade (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. 118th "Corn Exchange" Regiment at Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. 118th Pennsylvania Volunteers. Service history of the regiment. (Submitted on April 11, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 118th Pennsylvania Volunteers Monument. SIRIS entry for the monument. (Submitted on April 11, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Left Side of Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
3. Left Side of Monument
Back of Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
4. Back of Monument
Right Side of Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
5. Right Side of Monument
Cannon balls support the knapsack on top of the monument.
118th Pennsylvania Volunteers Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
6. 118th Pennsylvania Volunteers Monument
Rock Wall Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
7. Rock Wall
In front of and on either side of the monument is a rock wall used by the 118th Pennsylvania on July 3 for protection.
View from Big Round Top Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
8. View from Big Round Top
Looking down hill from the 118th Pennsylvania position. The pavement of South Confederate Avenue is seen running left to right through the trees. The Federal occupation of Big Round Top on the evening of July 2 effectively prevented any renewed Confederate offensive in this sector of the battlefield. In front of the 118th Pennsylvania, of Tilton's Brigade, were Confederates of Robertson's and Laws' Brigades. While both sides skirmished heavily, neither mounted any major maneuvers here on July 3. In the early evening, the Confederates withdrew back to Seminary Ridge.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,297 times since then and 101 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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