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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Where do we bury our dead? Lincoln Cemetery

 
 
Lincoln Cemetery Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
1. Lincoln Cemetery Marker
Inscription. The first half-acre of this cemetery was purchased in 1867 by a society of Black men calling themselves the “Sons of Goodwill,” and for many years this place was called the “Goodwill Cemetery.” The minutes of the Sons of Goodwill record that the only ground available for use as a cemetery was that of Eden Devan, a Black resident who owned about 3½ acres here in an area of town where many Colored citizens lived. The land at that time bordered a Catholic Cemetery along South Washington Street to the east.

Another cemetery established in 1824 for the “Colored Citizens” of the Borough was located at the east end of town. As the town expanded, pressure to sell that property promoted the Trustees of St. Paul’s AME Zion Church to purchase a small section of land adjacent to the Sons of Goodwill cemetery in 1906. The bodies of those buried on York Street were exhumed and moved here. In the 1920's the “Lincoln Lodge” of Gettysburg’s Black Elks purchased land bordering Long Lane, giving the name “Lincoln Cemetery” to this place.

Lincoln Cemetery is the final resting place for many families and citizens dating back to the first settlement of Gettysburg and Adams County. This Cemetery also serves as the final resting place for more than 30 Civil War veterans of the United
Lincoln Cemetery Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
2. Lincoln Cemetery Marker
States Colored Troops, who served without reservation in a segregated army, and after death were buried in a segregated cemetery even though their fight was for freedom and full citizenship.

It remains a tradition of Gettysburg’s Black citizens to hold a memorial service here each May to honor those buried here.

Funding for this wayside provided by the Hoffman Charitable Trust
 
Erected 2004 by the Lincoln Cemetery Project Association, Inc.
 
Location. 39° 49.557′ N, 77° 14.142′ W. Marker is in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of Long Lane and Kuhn Alley, on the right when traveling north on Long Lane. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Monumental Stories (a few steps from this marker); Basil Biggs (a few steps from this marker); Lincoln Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Lincoln Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Goodwill Cemetery (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Agricultural Hall
Lincoln Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
3. Lincoln Cemetery
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Franklin Street “Colored” School 1884-1932 (approx. 0.2 miles away); “… the battle itself proved a relief.” (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. In the upper right is a photo of the “Lincoln Cemetery in 1977, 20 years prior to restoration.” On the lower right is a photo of the “Colored Folks Memorial Day Parade in Gettysburg ca. 1934.” In the lower center is a photo of “Memorial Day 1942 - speaker Dr. Crampton. Dignitaries on rostrum (L-R): Francis Carter; David Stanton, Sr.; Rev. Shadney; and John Carter, Sr.”

The text for this marker was taken from the 2001 book Segregation In Death: Gettysburg’s Lincoln Cemetery by Betty Dorsey Myers.
 
Regarding Where do we bury our dead? Lincoln Cemetery. This cemetery has been preserved by volunteers, to give recognition to the Black citizens and the thirty “United States Colored Troops” that are interred there.
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial Sites
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,320 times since then and 80 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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