Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Boston in Suffolk County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Park Street Church

Freedom Trail

 
 
Park Street Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
1. Park Street Church Marker
Inscription. The English architect Peter Banner designed Park Street Church. It was built in 1809 on the site of the old Granary for which the adjoining burying ground, much older than the church, was named.

On July 4, 1829, William Lloyd Garrison delivered his first anti-slavery speech here and so launched his emancipation campaign with the words: “Since the cause of emancipation must progress heavily, and must meet with much unhallowed opposition – why delay the work?”
 
Location. 42° 21.398′ N, 71° 3.719′ W. Marker is in Boston, Massachusetts, in Suffolk County. Marker is at the intersection of Tremont Street and Park Street, on the right when traveling south on Tremont Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Boston MA 02108, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Boston Common (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Boston Common (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Boston Common (within shouting distance of this marker); Power System of Bostonís Rapid Transit (within shouting distance of this marker); Tragic Events
Marker on Boston's Freedom Trail image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
2. Marker on Boston's Freedom Trail
(within shouting distance of this marker); James Otis (within shouting distance of this marker); Huguenots, Women, and Tories (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Paul Revere Buried in this Ground (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Boston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Park Street Church. Details of the Freedom Trail from the City of Boston website. (Submitted on April 19, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Park Street Church -. Park Street Church became known for supporting Abolitionist causes where, on July 4, 1829, a young William Lloyd Garrison delivered his first major public speech against slavery....

A CAPELLA "My Country ĎTis of Thee" was sung on the steps of Park Street Church for the first time on July 4, 1831.

AN INCENDIARY THEORY The Park Street Church site was formerly called "Brimstone Corner." It may have gotten the nickname during the War of 1812 when the Congregationalists stored brimstone (a component of gunpowder) in the basement. Or perhaps itís because old-school Congregationalist ministers preached many a "hell-fire and brimstone" sermon here. (Submitted on August 29, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Park Street Church image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
3. Park Street Church
The Park Street Church is one of the sites located across the street from Boston Common along the route of the Freedom Trail.
Granary Burial Ground image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
4. Granary Burial Ground
Located adjacent to Park Street Church, this cemetery, first used in 1660, holds the remains of John Hancock, Paul Revere, Samuel Adams, Benjamin Franklin's parents and the victims of the Boston Massacre.
<i>Park Street Church, Boston, Mass.</i> image. Click for full size.
Photochrom postcard by the Detroit Photographic Company, 1904
5. Park Street Church, Boston, Mass.
Designed by Peter Banner, the 217 ft. steeple of Park Street Church was once the first landmark travelers saw when approaching Boston; a building that Author Henry James called “the most interesting mass of bricks and mortar in America.” Homage to famed architect Sir Christopher Wren (Banner modeled the spire after St. Brideís Church in London)....The Freedom Trail Foundation

Image courtesy of the Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 745 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5. submitted on . This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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