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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Courtland in Southampton County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mahone’s Tavern

A Social, Transportation and Political Hub

 
 
Mahone’s Tavern CWT Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 18, 2009
1. Mahone’s Tavern CWT Marker
Inscription. One of the oldest buildings in Southampton County, Mahone’s Tavern was a social, transportation, and political hub of Jerusalem (now Courtland) because of its proximity to the county courthouse. Beginning in 1796, the structure served as a tavern, operated by different proprietors as Kello’s Tavern (1799-1828) and Vaughan’s Tavern (1829-1839) until Fielding Mahone bought it in 1840. Mahone also bought Hart’s Tavern next door and connected the buildings with a passageway to form Mahone’s Tavern.

William Mahone, the future Confederate general, was thirteen years old when he moved to the tavern and later claimed that his winnings from gambling here enabled him to enter the Virginia Military Institute. In 1853, he was appointed chief engineer of the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad; he became president in 1860. After Virginia seceded in 1861, Mahone served as lieutenant colonel of Virginia volunteers, then rose in rank to brigadier general. He was promoted to major general after the 1864 Battle of the Crater in Petersburg for preventing the city’s capture. Historian Douglas Southall Freeman later wrote, “Many officers who were competent, even conspicuous, at a particular rank failed when given larger duties. Mahone reversed this. A brigadier with achievements scarcely above the army average, he proved himself within three
Mahone’s Tavern circa 1796. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 18, 2009
2. Mahone’s Tavern circa 1796.
months one of the ablest divisional commanders the army ever had.”

Early in May 1863, Kemper’s brigade (including two companies of Southampton County soldiers ) had passed through Jerusalem to reunite with the Army of Northern Virginia. The men encamped around Mahone’s Tavern for three days, allowing them a last visit with family before the march to Gettysburg. The building also was used as a Confederate hospital during this time.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 42.851′ N, 77° 4.022′ W. Marker is in Courtland, Virginia, in Southampton County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (Virginia Route 58) and Court Street, on the left when traveling east on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 22341 Main Street, Courtland VA 23837, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Rebecca Vaughan House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Old Indian Reservation (approx. 0.9 miles away); Nottoway Indians (approx. 2.4 miles away); General Thomas' Birthplace
Courtland Confederate Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 18, 2009
3. Courtland Confederate Monument
(approx. 2.6 miles away); Buckhorn Quarters (approx. 4.2 miles away); Dred Scott And The Blow Family (approx. 4.2 miles away); Marle Hill (approx. 4.7 miles away); Major Joseph E. Gillette (approx. 5.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Courtland.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a photo with the caption, “Unveiling of the Confederate monument in 1902, with a partial view of the tavern in the background.” On the upper right is a “Rendition of Mahone’s Tavern from a 1920’s photograph. Drawn by Michael Coe Watkinson, 1990.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Urquhart-Gillette Camp #1471, Sons of Confederate Veterans. Mahone's Tavern and Museum Inc. (Submitted on April 20, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Civil War Traveler - Tidewater Virginia - More Sites. Courtland. Mahone's Tavern. (Submitted on May 18, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsWar, US Civil
 
1861-1865 Our Confederate Dead Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 18, 2009
4. 1861-1865 Our Confederate Dead
A tribute to loyalty by comrades and friends.
Dedicated 1902.
Companies Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 18, 2009
5. Companies
D. 3rd Va. Infantry.
G. 3rd Va. Infantry.
A. 13th Va. Cavalry.
B. 9th Va. Infantry.
A. 18th Va. Battallion Artillery.
H. 41st Va. Infantry.

"With shouts above the canon's roar, they joined the legions gone before, they bravely fought, they bravely fell, they wore the gray and wore it well."
Confederate Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 18, 2009
6. Confederate Monument
"This shaft on which we carve no name, shall guide Virginia's youth - a sign-post on the road to fame, to honor and to truth, a silent sentry it shall stand to guard thro' coming time their graves who died for native land and duty most sublime."
Monument relocation tablet. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 18, 2009
7. Monument relocation tablet.
Originally dedicated September 17, 1902. Moved to present site and rededicated September 27, 1992. Urquhart-Gillette Camp #1471 Sons of Confederate Veterans
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,236 times since then and 127 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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