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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Concord in Middlesex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Muster Field

 
 
The Muster Field Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 17, 2009
1. The Muster Field Marker
Inscription.
“Will you let them burn the town down?”
Lt. Joseph Hosmer of Concord

“I haven’t a man who’s afraid to go.”
Captain Isaac Davis of Acton

“Do not fire on the King’s troops unless first fired upon.”
Colonel James Barrett of Concord


In the field beyond, Colonists held the first council of war of the American Revolution. There, on the high ground above the North Bridge, stood 400 citizen-soldiers – the assembled ranks of the colonial militia from Concord and surrounding towns. They were determined to maintain their liberty by force of arms if necessary.

With smoke rising from the center of town and the bridge held by 96 British Regulars, they made the decision to march into the town to save it. Under strict orders not to fire first, the Colonists began their march in a “very military manner” towards the Regulars at the bridge below.

“We determined to march to the center of town for its defence or die in the attempt,”
 
Erected by Minute Man National Historical Park.
 
Location. 42° 28.246′ N, 71° 21.177′ W. Marker is in Concord, Massachusetts, in Middlesex County
Marker in Minute Man Nat'l Hist Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 17, 2009
2. Marker in Minute Man Nat'l Hist Park
. Marker is on Liberty Street, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is located at the entrance to the North Bridge Visitor Center in Minute Man National Historical Park. Marker is in this post office area: Concord MA 01742, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The North Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Two Revolutions (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); An Evolving Legacy (about 300 feet away); Reflections of the Revolution (about 300 feet away); Major John Buttrick (about 300 feet away); Acton Minutemen (about 300 feet away); Major John Buttrick House (about 400 feet away); The Road to Colonel Barrett’s (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Concord.
 
More about this marker. The center of the marker contains the image of Colonial militiaman. The lower left of the marker features a photograph of the “Muster Field monument on Liberty Street in 1888. Note that Liberty Street, in front of you, dates from 1793 and was not present at the time of the battle.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Minute Man National Historical Park. National Park Service website. (Submitted on April 23, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battle of Concord.
The Muster Field image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 17, 2009
3. The Muster Field
The American Revolutionary War website. (Submitted on May 7, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Foundations of Ephraim & Willard Buttrick Houses image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 17, 2009
4. Foundations of Ephraim & Willard Buttrick Houses
The marker is located near the foundations of a 1697 house. The house was not standing at the time of the battle.
Ephraim & Willard Buttrick Houses  Circa 1697 image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 17, 2009
5. Ephraim & Willard Buttrick Houses Circa 1697
The March towards the North Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 17, 2009
6. The March towards the North Bridge
The Colonial militia marched towards the British Regulars across this field. The North Bridge can be seen in this photo taken from near the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,214 times since then and 119 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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