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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tybee Island in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

A Turning Point In History

The Reduction of Fort Pulaski

 

—The Battery —

 
A Turning Point In History Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, April 7, 2009
1. A Turning Point In History Marker
Inscription. This island became the "platform" on which the Union Army mounted 36 pieces of heavy artillery in early 1862. The bombardment that began on April 10 led to the surrender of Fort Pulaski 30 hours later. The placement of these batteries can be found on the map above.

No eye except an eye-witness can form any but a faint conception of the Herculean labor by which mortars of eight and one half tons and columbiads...were moved in the dead of night, over a narrow causeway, bordered by swamps on either side, and liable at any moment to be over turned and buried in mud beyond reach."

"Two hundred and fifty men were barely sufficient to move a single piece, on sling carts. They were not allowed to speak above a whisper, and were guided by the notes of a whistle."

 
Erected by Fort Pulaski National Monument U.S. Dept. of the Interior.
 
Location. 32° 0.97′ N, 80° 52.231′ W. Marker is in Tybee Island, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on Battery Park/Catalina Drive near US 80/ Ga 26, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tybee Island GA 31328, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the
A Turning Point In History Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2013
2. A Turning Point In History Marker
crow flies. Long Range Artillery Duel (within shouting distance of this marker); Cockspur Island Lighthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Federal Batteries on Tybee Island (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lazaretto (approx. half a mile away); The Breached Wall (approx. 1.3 miles away); Federal Siege Batteries (approx. 1.3 miles away); Brooke Rifle (approx. 1.4 miles away); 4.5 Inch Blakely Rifle (approx. 1.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Tybee Island.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Upper picture Photo, Click for full size
By A Turning Point In History Marker,
3. Upper picture
Map showing the positions of the batteries used by U.S. forces in the reduction of Fort Pulaski April 10 & 11, 1862, a turning point in U.S. Military History.
Accompanying Report of Brig. Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore, U.S. Vols.
<i>( Left picture ) </i> Photo, Click for full size
By A Turning Point In History Marker
4. ( Left picture )
This image depicts a 13-inch mortar firing on Fort Pulaski from Battery Stanton. Union leaders mistakenly believed that these 8.5 ton mortars would crush the Confederates into submission.( Center picture ) The difficulty of moving these heavy pieces from the naval vessels to this area was described by Gen. Gillmore.
Right picture, Brigadier General Quincy Adams Gillmore Photo, Click for full size
By A Turning Point In History Marker
5. Right picture, Brigadier General Quincy Adams Gillmore
A Turning Point In History Marker * Future Site * Photo, Click for full size
By The City of Tybee Island , National Park Service
6. A Turning Point In History Marker * Future Site *
Sign showing the projected battery reconstruction.
Welcome to Tybee Island Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, May 5, 2010
7. Welcome to Tybee Island
One of three sides to the kiosk marker.
Fort Pulaski National Monument Map Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, May 5, 2010
8. Fort Pulaski National Monument Map
Third side of the kiosk.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,300 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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