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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fremont in Sandusky County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

In Commemoration

 
 
In Commemoration Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2008
1. In Commemoration Marker
The "In Commemoration" marker is located bolted to the outside of this building, and it is obscured from view by a large bush, growing directly in front of it.
Inscription. Lt. Colonel Wm. C. Shortt, Lt. J.G. Gordon, 1 sergeant, 1 drummer, and 21 rank and file of the 41st Regiment, British regulars, who died in the assault on Fort Stephenson, August 2, 1813, and the succeeding amity between the contending nations.
 
Erected by Fort Stephenson Sesquicentennial Association 1963 and Sandusky County Historical Society 1965.
 
Location. Marker has been confirmed missing. It was likely located near 41° 20.717′ N, 83° 6.979′ W. Marker was in Fremont, Ohio, in Sandusky County. Marker was at the intersection of Garrison St. and High on Garrison St.. Click for map. This historical marker is located just to the northwest of the intersection of Garrison St. and High St., and it has been secured to the outside wall of what is presently a public school building, but as of the Spring of 2009 the city of Fremont is hoping to sell (and so there is no telling what its future use will be). For whatever the reason, there is currently a large bush growing in front of this marker and it acts to completely obscure this marker from the public's view. Marker was at or near this postal address: 529 Garrison St., Fremont OH 43420, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location
In Commemoration Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2008
2. In Commemoration Marker
The view of where this historical marker is located, on the north side of Garrison St., on the outside wall of the publc school building, hidden from view by having a large bush growing up in front of it.
. Fort Stephenson (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Stephenson (about 400 feet away); Old Betsy (about 400 feet away); Soldier's Monument (about 500 feet away); Fremont (about 600 feet away); Near This Spot (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Fremont (approx. 0.2 miles away); Indian Gantlet and Race Course (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fremont.
 
More about this marker. It is my understanding that while constructing a new wing to the public school building, that was situated just to the west of what had been Fort Stephenson, that workers came across the unmarked buried remains of two, long forgotten, British officers. Research led the community to believe that these were the remains of the two officers that had been killed in the battle for Fort Stephenson, and then their bodies left behind by Gen. Proctor.


It was later decided that a commemorative plaque should be placed upon the outside wall, of this newly constructed wing, along the north side of Garrison St., in order to honor these war dead.
 
Regarding In Commemoration. When visiting the former site of this historic marker on September 19, 2012, I noted that the building that the marker
In Commemoration Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, September 19, 2012
3. In Commemoration Marker
View of the former site of the historic marker, which has recently been torn down.
was affixed to had recently been torn down, and that the historic marker was missing. I was told that it is currently in storage, and that at some future date it will once again be put on display at this site.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryWar of 1812
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 820 times since then and 85 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   3. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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