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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Hickman in Fulton County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

New Madrid Earthquake

 
 
New Madrid Earthquake Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, March 17, 2009
1. New Madrid Earthquake Marker
Inscription. The greatest earthquake recorded in North America centered in this area Dec. 16, 1811 to Feb. 7, 1812. 1,874 quakes felt at Louisville, 250 miles away. Tremors also felt at Boston, Detroit, New Orleans. Reelfoot Lake, covering 25,000 acres, formed when some streams changed courses. New Madrid, Mo., destroyed; very few persons died, as population of area was sparse.
 
Erected 1964 by Kentucky Historical Society - Kentucky Department of Highways. (Marker Number 688.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kentucky Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 36° 31.073′ N, 89° 20.347′ W. Marker is near Hickman, Kentucky, in Fulton County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 94 and County Road 1282, on the right when traveling north on State Highway 94. Click for map. Located just north of Reelfoot Lake. Marker is in this post office area: Hickman KY 42050, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fulton County (approx. 8.9 miles away); Courthouse Steps (approx. 8.9 miles away); Where Dixie Begins (approx. 8.9 miles away); Confederate Forts & Batteries
New Madrid Earthquake Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, March 17, 2009
2. New Madrid Earthquake Marker
(approx. 9.3 miles away in Tennessee); Capture of Island No. 10 (approx. 9.3 miles away in Tennessee); Elvis J. Stahr, Jr. (approx. 9.3 miles away); Rufus B. Atwood (approx. 9.3 miles away); Hickman Bluff Stabilization Project (approx. 9.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hickman.
 
Also see . . .
1. The New Madrid Earthquakes. USGS page detailing the earthquake. Links off this site offer photos of the effects of the earthquake. (Submitted on April 28, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. New Madrid Fault Zone. An incredibly detailed site offering photos, maps, and even a "tour" of the earthquake zone. (Submitted on April 28, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Photographic Evidence of the Quakes. Set of photos taken between 1904 and 1912 showing the effects of the quakes were easy to locate even 100 years later. Even today sand blows and other effects of the earthquakes are visible if one knows where to look. (Submitted on April 28, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Disasters
 
Epicenter of Quake Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, March 17, 2009
3. Epicenter of Quake
The largest of the earthquakes, magintude 7.4 by some accounts, was recorded on February 7, 1812. Its epicenter was traced by the USGS to a location near the present day Noranda aluminum plant, south of New Madrid. The smokestacks of the plant are visible for many miles around, serving as a reference.
Mississippi River at New Madrid Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, March 17, 2009
4. Mississippi River at New Madrid
The town of New Madrid originally stood where the river runs today. At the time of the earthquake, the ground dropped and was soon covered by the river. The town was rebuilt on the new shore. In the distance are the smoke stacks of the aluminum plant.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 4,176 times since then and 98 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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