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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington in Middlesex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Buckman Tavern

 
 
Buckman Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 15, 2009
1. Buckman Tavern Marker
Inscription. In 1714, Lexington selectmen gave John Muzzey permission to keep a “Publique House of Entertainment.” On Sundays townspeople came here for a hot flip and a warm fire after sitting for hours in the unheated church.

John Buckman owned this inn during the Revolution. He gave it a new double hip roof to provide more attic bedrooms, obliterating its “saltbox” roof profile. In later years it served as the town post office. The Lexington Historical Society induced the town to buy the building in 1914 to save it from demolition. Today, the town owns the Tavern and the Society maintains it.
 
Location. 42° 26.984′ N, 71° 13.801′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Massachusetts, in Middlesex County. Marker is at the intersection of Bedford Street (Massachusetts Route 225) and Massachusetts Ave (Massachusetts Route 4), on the right when traveling north on Bedford Street. Click for map. Marker is located across the street from the Lexington Battle Green. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Bedford Street, Lexington MA 02420, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Memorial to the Lexington Minute Men (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Buckman Tavern (within
Lexington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 15, 2009
2. Lexington Marker
shouting distance of this marker); Prince Estabrook (within shouting distance of this marker); Rendezvous of the Minute Men (within shouting distance of this marker); Lexington Green (within shouting distance of this marker); This Flag Pole (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle Green (within shouting distance of this marker); Lexington Meeting Houses (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Lexington.
 
More about this marker. The top of the marker features a picture of British troops firing on the Minute Men on the Lexington Green. It has a caption of “Battle of Lexington re-engraved from a 1775 drawing. Buckman Tavern is the building marked 6.” The bottom of the marker contains a map of Lexington Center with the location of Buckman Tavern indicated.
 
Also see . . .
1. Buckman Tavern. Lexington Historical Society webpage. (Submitted on April 30, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Battle of Lexington. (Submitted on April 30, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
Buckman Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 15, 2009
3. Buckman Tavern
The Buckman Tavern, a National Historic Landmark, was the gathering point for the Lexington Minute Men on April 19, 1775.

3. Battle at Lexington Green, 1775. The Start of the American Revolution and the "shot heard round the world." from EyeWitness to History.com. (Submitted on April 30, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

4. The Battle of Lexington. The American Revolutionary War website. (Submitted on May 7, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable BuildingsWar, US Revolutionary
 
<i> EXT.- FRONT & SIDE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Buckman Tavern, Bedford Street, Lexington, </i> image. Click for full size.
By Frank O. Branzetti, April 7, 1941
4. EXT.- FRONT & SIDE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Buckman Tavern, Bedford Street, Lexington,
Photo courtesy of the Historic American Buildings Survey. Statement of significance: The earliest portion of this structure, built by Benjamin Muzzy, traditionally dates to the late seventeenth century. Operated as a tavern by John Buckman in 1775, it served as a gathering place for the Lexington Minute Men on the evening of April 18 and the morning of April 19, 1775, prior the arrival of the British troops on the Lexington Green. The first village store and the first post office were located in this building. Presently owned by the town of Lexington, it is opened to the public as a museum by the Lexington Historical Society. The United States Department of the Interior designated it a "Registered Landmark" in 1961.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,114 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on . This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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