Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Jose in Santa Clara County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Hayes Mansion

 
 
Hayes Mansion Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, April 24, 2009
1. Hayes Mansion Marker
Inscription. Jay Orley and Everis A. Hayes built this Mission Revival Style mansion, designed by George W. Page in 1904. The Hayes Brothers were early San Jose Mercury publishers, prominent valley politicians, and were actively involved in establishing the Santa Clara Valley fruit industry. The mansion consists of 62 rooms, 11 fireplaces, and was paneled in over a dozen different woods.
 
Erected 1986 by State Department of Parks and Recreation, Stella B. Gross Charitable Trust and Mountain Charlie Chapter No.1850. E Clampus Vitus. (Marker Number 888.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 37° 15.779′ N, 121° 49.168′ W. Marker is in San Jose, California, in Santa Clara County. Marker is on Edenvale Avenue north of Chynoweth Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is located at the entrance to the Dolce Hayes Mansion Hotel & Conference Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 Edenvale Avenue, San Jose CA 95136, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Hayes Mansion (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Frontier Village
Hayes Mansion Markers Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, April 24, 2009
2. Hayes Mansion Markers
Smaller Marker on Left:
San Jose Historic Landmark-Hayes Mansion Mission Revival Style Mansion, designed by George W. Page in 1904. Purchased by the City of San Jose in 1984. Dedicated by Stella Gross Trust and Mt. Charlie Chapter, ECV.

Smaller Marker on Right:
This Property, HAYES MANSION has been placed on the NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES by the Untited States Department of the Interior. Dedicated April 19, 1986 by Stella B. Gross Charitable Trust and Mountain Charlie Chapter No.1850
(approx. ¼ mile away); Keesling’s Shade Trees (approx. 0.9 miles away); New Almaden Quicksilver Mine (approx. 2 miles away); The Bernal Adobe Site and Bear Tree (approx. 2.9 miles away); George Donner, Jr. (approx. 3.1 miles away); Dr. John Towsend (approx. 3.2 miles away); Jean Jacques Vioget (approx. 3.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Jose.
 
Regarding Hayes Mansion. This site was designated as California Registered Historical Landmark No. 888 on December 29, 1975.

This site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on August 1, 1975.

This site has been designated as a City of San Jose Registered Historical Landmark.
 
Also see . . .  The Hayes Mansion. The Hayes Mansion was built in 1905 to replace the original Queen Anne style family home, destroyed by fire in 1899. (Submitted on May 1, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. History of the Hayes Family and the Hayes Mansion
Marker at Main Entrance of Building Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, April 25, 2009
3. Marker at Main Entrance of Building
The Hayes Mansion
Mary Hayes Chynoweth, matriarch of the Hayes family, built this 65 room, 41,000 square foot Mediterranean Revival-Style mansion to replace an earlier Victorian one which had been destroyed by fire. While she did not live to occupy the mansion herself, her two sons and their families lived in the house for four decades.

Everis Anson Hayes and Jay Orley Hayes were two of San Jose’s most influential and illustrious citizens. E.A. Hayes served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1904 to 1918. J.O. Hayes was founder and president of the California Prune and Apricot Growers Association, which later became known as Sunsweet Growers. Together the two brothers owned and published the San Jose Mercury and the San Jose Herald Newspapers.

The Edenvale Estate was a center of social and political activity for the Santa Clara Valley and was visited by many distinguished public figures.

The Hayes Mansion was designed by architect George Page and completed in 1905. Renovation and remodeling was completed in 1994 by the public/private partnership of the City of San Jose and the Renaissance Conference Company.

The Hayes family, led by the matriarch, Mary Hayes Chynoweth, became wealthy through its iron ore mining ventures in Wisconsin and Michigan beginning in 1885. The family, Mary, her two sons, Jay and Everis, along with their young families, moved to San Jose in 1887 after purchasing 239 acres and a house from Frederick Tennant. Their first mansion, a 22,000 square foot 1891 Queen Anne Victorian woth more than fifty rooms, burned to the ground in 1899.

Construction on the current Hayes mansion began in 1903 and the family, except Mary (who had died on July 27th) moved into the mansion in 1905. The mansion was 41,000 square feet and contained 64 rooms. Just like the first mansion, this one was built as a triple residence. Mary was to occupy the the rooms on the second floor of the center portion, and sons Jay and Everis and their families had the East and West wings respectfully.

The Hayes family ultimately owned nearly 700 acres of land adjoining the mansion, much of which was planted in fruit orchards and the rest for general family farming to support the family and staff. Almost everything that the family ate was grown and processed here.

Both Jay and Everis obtained their law degrees in Wisconsin, but left the legal trade to manage the mines and other family enterprises. They purchased the San Jose Herald in 1900 and the San Jose Mercury
Hayes Mansion Main Entrance Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, April 25, 2009
4. Hayes Mansion Main Entrance
in 1901 as a means of supporting good government in San Jose during a time when corruption was rampant. They also purchased The Evening News in 1941. These newspapers eventually became the San Jose Mercury News.

In addition to their newspaper enterprises, Everis was a seven-term member of the House of Representatives and Jay was also involved in politics on the state level. Jay was also one of the founders of the California Dried Fruit Association during the time when the Santa Clara Valley was known worldwide as a dried fruit producer.

Source: Dolce Hayes Mansion Self-Guided Walking Tour Brochure. Piece written by Nancy L. Newlin.
    — Submitted May 1, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.

 
Categories. Industry & CommerceLandmarksNotable Buildings
 
West Wing Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, April 25, 2009
5. West Wing
Living area of the Everis Hayes Family
East Wing Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, April 25, 2009
6. East Wing
Living area of the Jay Hayes Family
Everis A. Hayes Photo, Click for full size
By Unknown
7. Everis A. Hayes
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 1,495 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement