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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Poteat Hall

 
 
Poteat Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 25, 2009
1. Poteat Hall Marker
Inscription.
In Memorial
Edwin McNeil Poteat, D.D., L.L.D
1861-1937

President 1903-1918
Teacher 1934-1937

 
Erected 1958.
 
Location. 34° 55.333′ N, 82° 26.467′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Click for map. Marker is on the east facade of the building, located on the campus of Furman University. Marker is in this post office area: Greenville SC 29617, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Geer Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Eugene E. Stone III Soccer Stadium (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Herman N. Hipp Hall (about 700 feet away); Jane Fishburne Hipp Plaza (about 700 feet away); Herman W. Lay Physical Activities Center (about 700 feet away); Furman Men Who Gave Their Lives in the World War (approx. 0.2 miles away); Marshall E. and Vera Lea Rinker Hall (approx. 0.2 miles away); Charles H. Townes Center for Science (approx. 0.2 miles away); Richard W. Riley Hall (approx. 0.2 miles away); James Buchanan Duke Library (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Greenville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Edwin McNeill Poteat (1861-1937).
Poteat Hall image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 25, 2009
2. Poteat Hall
Poteat is named for Edwin McNeill Poteat who was Furman's president from 1903 to 1918. Before coming to Furman, Poteat was a pastor. He established the Bachelor of Science degree and separated biology and chemistry into two departments. Poteat was very supportive of student societies and clubs. Quaternion, leadership society was founded during Poteat's tenure. The Hornet, weekly newspaper, was established and intercollegiate athletics were revived. In addition to working closely with the students, Poteat also established a strong and dedicated faculty. (Source: http://www.furman.edu/housing/rhnew.htm#poteat.)
Poteat, Edwin McNeill (6 Feb. 1861 - 25 June 1937), clergyman and educator, was born near Yanceyville in Caswell County, the youngest of three children of James and Julia A. McNeill Poteat. (Submitted on May 1, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Furman University. Official website of Furman University. (Submitted on May 1, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Caswell County (North Carolina) Family Tree. In the Caswell County (North Carolina) Family Tree database is information on Edwin McNeill Poteat (1861-1937) and his distinguished family. (Submitted on May 2, 2009, by Caswell County Historical Association of Yanceyville, North Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. About Dr. Edwin M Poteat
Dr. Poteat was elected as the fourth president of Furman University on June 10, 1903. He was not a supporter of school athletics, considering them a necessary nuisance of college life. In 1904, football was suppressed. It was not restored until 1912. (Source: Furman University Chronology, compiled by Michael Orr, http://library.furman.edu/specialcollections/furman_chronology.pdf.)
    — Submitted May 1, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
Edwin M. Poteat Tombstone -<br>Springwood Cemetery, Greenville, SC image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 9, 2009
3. Edwin M. Poteat Tombstone -
Springwood Cemetery, Greenville, SC
Edwin McNeill Poteat Sr.
1861-1937
Forever with the Lord
President
Furman University
1903-1818

2. Palm Sunday and Monday by Dr. Edwin M Poteat, Jr., son of President Poteat
They pluck their palm branches and hail him as King,
Early on Sunday;
They spread out their garments; hosannas they sing,
Early on Sunday.

But where is the noise of their hurrying feet,
The crown they would offer, the sceptre, the seat?
Their King wanders hungry, forgot in the street,
Early on Monday.

(Source: Masterpieces of Religious Verse, edited by James Dalton Morrison (1948), pg. 182.)
    — Submitted May 1, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 908 times since then and 85 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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