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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chambersburg in Franklin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Abolitionist John Brown Boards in Chambersburg

 
 
Abolitionist John Brown Boards in Chambersburg Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Robert H. Moore, II, April 25, 2009
1. Abolitionist John Brown Boards in Chambersburg Marker
Inscription. Preparing for the raid on Harpers Ferry arsenal, John Brown came to Chambersburg in the summer of 1859 wearing a beard as a disguise and using the alias of Isaac Smith. He took up residence at Mary Ritner’s boarding house on East King Street, professing to be a developer of iron mines in Maryland and Virginia.

Mining implements consigned to Smith and Sons soon arrived at warehouses in town. They were actually firearms, ammunition, and pikes with which Brown wished to arm the many Blacks who he thought would flock to his cause. Brown would secretly meet with Frederick Douglass, notable former slave and abolitionist, in a quarry west of town. Leading up to and after the raid, members of Brown’s militia passed through Greencastle, Mont Alto, and Mercersburg. Seven of Brown’s men eluded capture after the raid. One of them, Albert Hazlett, manage to hitch a buggy ride with a farmer named Hiram Wertz, who lived in Quincy. Leaving Wertz before he reached Chambersburg, Hazlett was later captured at Carlisle. Wertz never revealed his true mission, conductor on the Underground Railroad through his farm at Quincy.
 
Erected 2009 by Pennsylvania Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Pennsylvania Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location.
John Brown's Raid Interpretive Panel in the nearby Heritage Center Photo, Click for full size
By Robert H. Moore, II, April 25, 2009
2. John Brown's Raid Interpretive Panel in the nearby Heritage Center
39° 56.238′ N, 77° 39.698′ W. Marker is in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, in Franklin County. Marker is on Lincoln Way (Route 30). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Chambersburg PA 17201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Burning of Chambersburg (here, next to this marker); Confederate Conference (here, next to this marker); Memorial Fountain and Union Soldier Statue (a few steps from this marker); Union Soldiers of Franklin County (within shouting distance of this marker); World War II – Korean Conflict – Vietnam Conflict (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S.S. Maine Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Mexican War – Spanish American War – World War (within shouting distance of this marker); War Between the States (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Chambersburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays a Historic photograph of the John Brown House, Courtesy of the Franklin County Historical Society. Also dispalyed is a portrait of
John Brown, Courtesy of the National Archives.
 
Also see . . .  John Brown at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on July 19, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansWar, US Civil
 
Pennsylvania Civil War Trails Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 7, 2010
3. Pennsylvania Civil War Trails Marker
Abolitionist John Brown Boards in Chambersburg Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Robert H. Moore, II, April 25, 2009
4. Abolitionist John Brown Boards in Chambersburg Marker
Slavery and Freedom Interpretive Panel in the nearby Heritage Center Photo, Click for full size
By Robert H. Moore, II, April 25, 2009
5. Slavery and Freedom Interpretive Panel in the nearby Heritage Center
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,761 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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