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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chatsworth in Murray County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Chief Vann House

 
 
Chief Vann House Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, May 3, 2009
1. Chief Vann House Marker
Inscription. Built of locally made brick in 1804, this house, the finest in the Cherokee Nation, was the home a Town Chief, James Vann, son of a Scotch trader, Clement Vann, and his wife, a Cherokee chieftain's daughter. Around his home were several of his business ventures and many acres of land tilled by his slaves. Sponsor of Spring Place Mission, shrewd, amiable but violent, James Vann shot his brother-in-law in 1808 and, in accordance with tribal law, was killed by relatives in 1809. His son, Joseph (Rich Joe) Vann (1798-1844), inherited this estate. Increasing the wealth and influence of the Vanns. When expelled in early 1834, Joseph Vann fled to Tennessee and settled, finally at Webbers Falls, Oklahoma. Racing his steamboat The Lucy Walker on the Ohio river, he died when the overheated boiler exploded near Louisville, Kentucky, in October, 1844.
A tempting prize to white men, the Vann House was the scene of a bloody battle between rival claimants in 1834. Deteriorating since, it was purchased in 1952 by a group of public-spirited citizens of Atlanta, Chatsworth and Dalton, and deeded to the Georgia Historical Commission. Restored to its original grandeur, it is a monument to the culture of the Cherokees.
 
Erected 1954 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 105-4.)
 
Marker series.
Chief Vann House Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, February 19, 2005
2. Chief Vann House Marker
The marker in 2005, before the foliage was trimmed away.
This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission, and the Trail of Tears marker series.
 
Location. 34° 45.838′ N, 84° 49.31′ W. Marker is in Chatsworth, Georgia, in Murray County. Marker is on Georgia Route 225, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Chatsworth GA 30705, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John Howard Payne (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Federal Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); Springplace Mission (approx. 0.4 miles away); Murray County (approx. 3 miles away); a different marker also named Old Federal Road (approx. 5 miles away); Mystery Shrouds Fort Mountain (approx. 6.5 miles away); Legends of Fort Mountain (approx. 6.5 miles away); Fort Mountain State Park (approx. 6.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Chatsworth.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located on the grounds of the historic site. The gates are closed when the visitors center is not open.
 
Also see . . .
1. Chief Vann House Historic Site. Georgia State Parks website with hours and events. (Submitted on May 3, 2009, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.) 

2. Chief Vann House. The New Georgia Encyclopedia. (Submitted on May 3, 2009, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.)
Chief Vann House & Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, May 3, 2009
3. Chief Vann House & Marker
 
 
Additional keywords. Trail of Tears
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USNative AmericansNotable BuildingsNotable EventsNotable PersonsNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Chief Vann House & Historic Structures image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, May 3, 2009
4. Chief Vann House & Historic Structures
The Vann House is the brick building visible in the background.
Chief Vann House image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, May 3, 2009
5. Chief Vann House
Chief Vann House Visitors Center image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, May 3, 2009
6. Chief Vann House Visitors Center
Chief Vann House Entrance to Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, February 21, 2009
7. Chief Vann House Entrance to Historic Site
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,469 times since then and 126 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.   2. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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