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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Calistoga in Napa County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Dr. Edward Turner Bale

 
 
Dr. Edward Turner Bale Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 26, 2009
1. Dr. Edward Turner Bale Marker
Inscription. Edward Bale sailed from England to California in the 1830s and settled in Monterey where he was named surgeon-in chief of the Mexican Army by General Mariano Vallejo. In 1839 he married Vallejo’s niece, Maria Soberanes, and in 1841 was granted a large rancho in the upper Napa Valley. Cattle were raised for hides and tallow and wheat was planted along the river in this valley. Bale constructed a gristmill at his site to process the locally grown grain. He also built a sawmill on his rancho where logs were cut for the area’s early frame buildings. He died in 1849 at the age of 38, leaving behind his wife and six young children.
Dedicated April 15, 2000. Rededicated September 20, 2003
Sam Brannan 1004
E Clampus Vitus

 
Erected 2000 by Sam Brannan Chapter 1004 E Clampus Vitus. (Marker Number 359.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 38° 32.4′ N, 122° 30.598′ W. Marker is in Calistoga, California, in Napa County. Marker can be reached from Saint Helena Highway (State Highway 29/128). Click for map. Marker is located at the parking area of the Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park, .4 of a
Dr. Edward Turner Bale Marker image. Click for full size.
By Loren Wilson
2. Dr. Edward Turner Bale Marker
mile from highway, at the beginning of the trail to the mill. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3801 Saint Helena Highway, Calistoga CA 94515, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bale Grist Mill (within shouting distance of this marker); The White Church (approx. 0.7 miles away); Reason P. Tucker (approx. 1.1 miles away); Schramsberg (approx. 1.5 miles away); Larkmead Winery / Kornell Cellars (approx. 1.5 miles away); Charles Krug Winery (approx. 1.9 miles away); Cesare Mondavi 1883 – 1959 (approx. 1.9 miles away); Charles Krug 1825 - 1892 (approx. 1.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Calistoga.
 
Regarding Dr. Edward Turner Bale. This site was designated as California Registered Historical Landmark No.359 on October 9, 1939.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park. A detailed history of the Mill and Dr. Edward Turner Bale (Submitted on May 4, 2009.) 

2. California State Park website giving information on the park. (Submitted on May 4, 2009.)
3. California State Historical Resources Commission. The certificate of Resolution 2008-04 Commendation: The Bale Gristmill State Historic Park. (Submitted on May 4, 2009.) 
 
Additional comments.
Dr. Edward Turner Bale Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 26, 2009
3. Dr. Edward Turner Bale Marker

1. Additional Information Regarding the Marker Dedication
Johnny Lind was Noble Grand Hunbug when this plaque was erected. The monument was constructed by Johnny
Lind, Carl Schoelles, and Loren Wilson. Plaque wording by Loren A. Wilson.
    — Submitted April 15, 2012, by Loren Wilson of Sebastopol, California.

 
Categories. Industry & CommerceLandmarksNotable PersonsNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
A Second Marker at the Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park image. Click for more information.
By Syd Whittle, April 26, 2009
4. A Second Marker at the Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park
These markers are located about half way between parking area and the mill.

Upper Marker:
This historic grist mill known as the “Bale Mill” was erected by Dr. E.T. Bale, Grantee Carne Human Rancho, in 1846. The mill with its surrounding land was deeded to the Native Sons of the Golden West by Mrs. W.W. Lyman. Restored through the efforts of the Native Son Parlors of Napa County. Under the leadership of past Grand President Bismark Bruck, a grandson of Dr. Bale, and by the Historic Landmarks Committee of the Native Sons of the Golden West. The restored mill was dedicated June 21, 1925.
Tablet placed by Historic Landmarks Committee,
Native Sons of the Golden West

Lower Marker:
OLD BALE MILL
Rededicated October 1, 1988
By
Napa Valley Parlors
and the
Grand Parlor
Native Sons of the Golden West
Frank Compani, President

Click for more information.
Harnessing Waterpower image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 26, 2009
5. Harnessing Waterpower

An Interpretive Panel on the trail to the mill.
Waterwheels have been used for some 2,000 years. Such early mechanical inventions were an important way for people of the past to use available resources. These wheels provided tireless and consistent power for many kids of milling machines. Their basic designs changed little, and millers used the type best suited to each mill condition.

--Horizontal waterwheels were driven by water diverted from fast-moving streams.
--Breasted waterwheels received the water’s impact at about midlevel of the vertical height.
--Undershot wheels turned as fast-moving water hit the lowest part of the wheel.

The Bale Mill’s overshot wheel is a type often used where the water source was high. Power came from the weight of falling water rather than its force of flow.

Water from Mill Creek, diverted by upstream dams, was delivered by ditches and flumes to operate the Bale Mill’s waterwheel.
Community Gathering Spot image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 26, 2009
6. Community Gathering Spot
Interpretive panel on the trail to the mill.
Grist mills were central to early American agriculture. Thomas Jefferson wrote to a friend, “…there is no neighborhood in any part of the United States without a water grist mill for grinding the corn of the neighborhood.” The 1840 census showed 23,661 small mills operating on a toll basis – the miller earning a percentage of the grain – and serving a U.S. population of 17 million.

A mill became a community social center. Farmers brought in grains (grist) and stayed to exchange market news of gossip, Good will came with grinding a neighbor’s grist, and all the miller’s customers were neighbors. The miller became prominent to the community, building a business to be handed down for generations.

The Bale Mill’s granary was used for more than storage. Its size and closeness to the valley’s main roads made it ideal for meetings, social gatherings, and even dances.
Bale's Grist Mill image. Click for more information.
Wm. H. Knowles Collection San Francisco, California, circa 1930
7. Bale's Grist Mill
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress) HABS CAL,28-CAL.V,1-
Click for more information.
Bale's Grist Mill image. Click for more information.
By Robert W. Kerrigan, Photographer, February 18, 1937
8. Bale's Grist Mill
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress) HABS CAL,28-CAL.V,1-
Click for more information.
The Old Bale Mill image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 26, 2009
9. The Old Bale Mill
As seen from the trail approaching the site.
Bale Grist Mill image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 26, 2009
10. Bale Grist Mill
Mill Stones on Display image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 26, 2009
11. Mill Stones on Display
The Old Bale Mill image. Click for full size.
By Jack W. Coburn,Martinez, Ca.
12. The Old Bale Mill
Description on Postcard:
This relic of pioneer days is located between St.Helena and Calistoga. Built in 1846 by Dr. Edward T.Bale,it furnished flour to the residents of the Napa Valley for over thirty-five years. Still standing with its overshot water wheel of 45 feet now idle,this historic building is a landmark for tourists.
Dr. Edward Turner Bale image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 26, 2009
13. Dr. Edward Turner Bale
Photo on Display in Museum
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 2,379 times since then and 186 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   2. submitted on , by Loren Wilson of Sebastopol, California.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   13. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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