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Gloucester Point in Gloucester County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Vital British Outpost at Gloucester Point

 
 
A Vital British Outpost at Gloucester Point Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 2, 2009
1. A Vital British Outpost at Gloucester Point Marker
Inscription. “They have one or two little works to preserve a communication with the Country.” American General Anthony Wayne describes the British defenses at Gloucester Point, 1781

In 1781, large armies and important events came to Gloucester Point and to Yorktown across the river. An 8,300 man British army, commanded by General Charles Lord Cornwallis, marched to the Virginia coast to establish a naval base. A French battle fleet, allies of the Americans, beat British ships sailing to ensure British control of the Chesapeake Bay. After the September 5th “Battle of the Capes,” in which the French navy inflicted heavy damage on the British fleet, Cornwallisís army was all but trapped at Yorktown.

In late September, General George Washington, commanding a 17,600 man American and French army, arrived at Yorktown. Gloucester Point became the only “communication with the country” for the besieged British. They needed the Point as a base to forage for local supplies and as an escape route from Yorktown.

British forces built a strong defensive line across the Point nearby to your right. Four redoubts, earthen forts reinforced with artillery, were joined by a stockade that stretched from shore to shore. About 900 soldiers guarded these isolated defenses.
 
Erected by
Map of Chesapeake Bay. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 2, 2009
2. Map of Chesapeake Bay.
The September 5, 1781, “Battle of the Capes” between British and French fleets ended in a draw but the French sealed off the Chesapeake Bay. The British ships returned to New York and their army was soon surrounded at Yorktown. Courtesy of the Library of Congress
National Park Service, Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network.
 
Location. 37° 15.023′ N, 76° 30.109′ W. Marker is in Gloucester Point, Virginia, in Gloucester County. Marker can be reached from Vernon Street near Riverview Street. Click for map. The marker is on the Tyndallís Point Park Walkway. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1376 Vernon Street, Gloucester Point VA 23062, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Attacking with “Decisive Vigor” (here, next to this marker); The British Safety Valve (within shouting distance of this marker); Natives, Explorers, Tobacco and Buccaneers (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Gloucester Point (within shouting distance of this marker); Gloucester Point (within shouting distance of this marker); After the Surrender at Yorktown (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Gloucester Point (within shouting distance of this marker); Early Land Patent (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gloucester Point.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Revolutionary
 
British Defenses at Gloucester Point. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 2, 2009
3. British Defenses at Gloucester Point.
The British defenses at Gloucester Point featured twenty cannons spread though four redoubts. The defenses behind the stockade were forced to hug the Point with their backs to the water. Courtesy of the Library of Congress
The Tyndallís Point Park Walkway. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 2, 2009
4. The Tyndallís Point Park Walkway.
Markers and earthworks at Gloucester Point. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 2, 2009
5. Markers and earthworks at Gloucester Point.
Tyndallís Point Park Entrance. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 2, 2009
6. Tyndallís Point Park Entrance.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 754 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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