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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Maumee in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fort Miamis

Anthony Wayne Parkway

 
 
Fort Miamis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 28, 2009
1. Fort Miamis Marker
Inscription. On this site in 1794, the British built Fort Miamis to block Gen. Anthony Wayne's expected march on Detroit. Its strategic location commanded both the land and water routes in the Maumee Valley. The post, constructed after the manner of the noted French military engineer, Sebastien Vauban, was essentially an earthwork of ditches and embankments, re-enforced by log stockades and buildings, so impregnable did it appear that Gen. Wayne, after routing the Indians at Fallen Timbers (Aug. 20, 1794), did not attempt to take the garrison. By a provision of the Jay Treaty, Fort Miamis was surrendered to the United States in 1796. In the War of 1812, the site was re-occupied by the British under Gen. Procter and the Indians under Tecumseh when they unsuccessfully besieged Gen. Harrison at Fort Meigs.
 
Erected 1955 by The Historical Society of Northwestern Ohio.
 
Location. 41° 34.389′ N, 83° 37.615′ W. Marker is in Maumee, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker is at the intersection of River Road and Michigan Avenue, on the left when traveling south on River Road. Click for map. This historical marker is located where Michigan Avenue. dead ends into River Road, on the river side of River Road, in a small, Lucas County MetroPark,
Fort Miamis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 28, 2009
2. Fort Miamis Marker
A close-up view of the historical marker's map showing the various military campaign routes and sites of military fortifications and battles during the Indian Wars of 1790 - 1795.
which is situated along the west side of the Maumee River. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1900 River Road, Maumee OH 43537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site (here, next to this marker); 41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 / Private Patrick Russell (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Fort Miamis (within shouting distance of this marker); The Indian Wars (within shouting distance of this marker); British Betray Indian Allies (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Miamis During the War of 1812 (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Running a Gauntlet (about 400 feet away); A Strategic Location (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Maumee.
 
More about this marker. The city of Maumee had created a park at the site of Fort Miamis in order to protect and preserve a significant portion of the original earthworks that made up the fortification that is discussed on this historical marker. This park became part of the Lucas County Metropark system, and was recently made a part of the National Park System.
 
Regarding Fort Miamis. Although
Fort Miamis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 28, 2009
3. Fort Miamis Marker
View of historical marker in the foreground with the Fort Miamis park in the background and a portion of the fort's earthworks seen in the extreme background.
all of the land on the south side of the Great Lakes had been ceded to the United States of America in the treaty that concluded the Revolutionary War, the British were so intent upon creating an Indian nation buffer zone between their Canadian holdings and the advancing American settlers that they were willing to build a strong fortification in the ceded territory in order to encourage and support the Native American cause against the expanding American interests into the Ohio country.

The fort that the British built was unique to the many forts built during the "Indian Wars of 1790 to 1795" in that instead of being a wooden stockaded fortification designed to withstand a Native American assault, this fort makes use of extensive earthworks and ditches and is clearly designed with the intention of being able to withstand an assault by a White-European military force. It is interesting to note that prior to his arriving at and viewing Fort Miamis, General Wayne had bragged about his own recently constructed Fort Defiance and stated, "I defy the English, the Indians, and all the devils in Hell to take it." However, after viewing the British fortifications at Fort Miamis, not only did he shy away from assaulting this seemingly impregnable fortification, but upon his return to Fort Defiance he ordered some additional improvements made to its defenses.

Because the
Fort Miamis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, January 30, 2010
4. Fort Miamis Marker
Another, more distant view of historical marker in its new location, with the site of Fort Miamis in the background.
city of Maumee, Ohio acted to preserve a significant portion of the earthwork fortifications at Fort Miamis by creating a park, this historic fort site is unique to this period because unlike most of the others, when you visit the site of Fort Miamis you can actually visualize what it must have looked like. Although somewhat time worn the existing earthworks clearly reveal the size, shape, and design of the original fortification.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Miamis. This is a link to information provided by the Touring-Ohio's website. (Submitted on May 20, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Fort Miami (Ohio). This is a ink to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on January 16, 2010, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site, Ohio. This is a link to information provided by the National Park Service. (Submitted on May 5, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Relocated marker
While recently driving past the location of the Fort Miamis site I noticed that there were some changes in the park signs and in the historical marker location. For the very first time I saw that there was a park sign that included the emblem of the
Fort Miamis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, January 30, 2010
5. Fort Miamis Marker
View of historical marker in its new location, with the site of Fort Miamis in the background.
National Park Service and I noticed that the historical marker had been relocated from the north side of the parking lot to the east side.

I have attempted to add some pictures to this web site that that visually display these changes. The new location of the historical marker is not that far away from its old location and it is now situated along the walking path that leads to the Fort Miamis site from the parking lot.
    — Submitted January 30, 2010, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansWar of 1812Wars, US Indian
 
Fort Miamis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, September 3, 2014
6. Fort Miamis Marker
View of the historical marker in its current location, along with several new markers in the background.
Fort Miamis Earthwork Fortifications image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 28, 2009
7. Fort Miamis Earthwork Fortifications
Fort Miamis Earthwork Fortifications image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 28, 2009
8. Fort Miamis Earthwork Fortifications
Fort Miamis national Park Service Sign image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, January 30, 2010
9. Fort Miamis national Park Service Sign
View of recently erected park sign, indicating that Fort Miamis is part of the Toledo Area Metroparks system and that it is now recognized by the Federal Park Service as a National Historical Site.
Fort Miamis image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, January 30, 2010
10. Fort Miamis
View of seasonal park service sign prohibiting sledding on the Fort Miamis earthworks in order to protect the National Historic Site.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,104 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   4, 5. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   6. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   7, 8. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   9, 10. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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