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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Abbeville in Abbeville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Pickens

 
 
Fort Pickens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
1. Fort Pickens Marker
Inscription.
This stone
marks the place
where, in 1767,
Gen. Andrew Pickens
built a
Block House
as a place of refuge
against the Indians.
It was used as a fort
during the
Revolutionary War
and was known as
Fort Pickens.

 
Erected 1922 by Alexander Hamilton Chapter, D.A.R.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 34° 10.967′ N, 82° 22.417′ W. Marker is in Abbeville, South Carolina, in Abbeville County. Marker is at the intersection of Cambridge Street and Washington Street (South Carolina Route 203) on Cambridge Street. Click for map. Marker is located near the Little River Electric Co-op Building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 Cambridge Street, Abbeville SC 29620, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colonial Block House/Fort Pickens (within shouting distance of this marker); First Secession Meeting Boulder (approx. 0.3 miles away); Secession Hill (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Secession Hill (approx.
Fort Pickens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
2. Fort Pickens Marker
0.3 miles away); Henry McNeal Turner (approx. 0.3 miles away); Conservation Cabin (approx. 0.4 miles away); This Water Fountain (approx. 0.4 miles away); Marie Cromer Seigler (approx. 0.4 miles away); Clarence E. Pressley (approx. 0.4 miles away); First Secession Meeting Columns (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Abbeville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Andrew Pickens. Andrew Pickens (September 13, 1739 – August 11, 1817) was a militia leader in the American Revolution and a member of the United States House of Representatives from South Carolina. (Submitted on May 9, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Fort Pickens (Florida). Fort Pickens is a pentagonal historic United States military fort on Santa Rosa Island in the Pensacola, Florida, area. (Submitted on May 9, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Andrew Pickens (1739-1817)
Andrew Pickens, (grandfather of Francis Wilkinson Pickens), a Representative from
Fort Pickens Marker and Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
3. Fort Pickens Marker and Cannon
The cannon was unearthed in the early 1990s. It is thought to be from the actual fort. Little River Electric Building is in the rear.
South Carolina; born in Paxton, Bucks County, Pa., September 13, 1739; attended the common schools; moved with his parents to the Waxhaw settlement in South Carolina in 1752; served in the provincial militia in the campaign against the Cherokee Indians in 1760; entered the Revolutionary Army as captain of militia and attained the rank of brigadier general; commanded an expedition against the Cherokee Indians in 1782; member of the state house of representatives 1781-1794; one of the commissioners named to settle the boundary line between South Carolina and Georgia in 1787; member of the state constitutional convention in 1790; elected as an Anti-Administration candidate to the Third Congress (March 4, 1793-March 3, 1795); appointed major general of militia in 1795; unsuccessful candidate for election to the United States Senate in 1797; member of the state house of representatives 1800-1812; declined the nomination for governor in 1812; died in Tomassee, Pendleton District, S.C., August 11, 1817; interment in Old Stone Churchyard, near Pendleton, S.C. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted May 9, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNotable BuildingsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Hemphill -<br>Estate of Robert R. Hemphill<br>Editor of the <i>Abbeville Medium</i> image. Click for full size.
Abbeville County by the Abbeville County Historical Society, November 13, 2009
4. Hemphill -
Estate of Robert R. Hemphill
Editor of the Abbeville Medium
Hemphill was built on the site of Fort Pickens. Little River Electric Building stands on the sight now.
General Andrew Pickens (1739-1817) image. Click for full size.
By Wilber George Kurtz
5. General Andrew Pickens (1739-1817)
General Pickens is pictured here with the Block House which he built to the east of the square as a refuge for women and children in the event of an Indian attack. His home was not far from the Block House and was burned by the Tories during the Revolution. The General owned much of the land that now makes up the city of Abbeville, and is largely responsible for the location of the town on its present site. The section of the town known as Fort Pickens was named in his honor and the spring in the rear of the courthouse was known for many years as Pickens' Big Spring.
Brig. Gen. Andrew Pickens<br>1739–1817 image. Click for full size.
Fort Hill Collection, Clemson, South Carolina
6. Brig. Gen. Andrew Pickens
1739–1817
S.C. House of Rep 1781-1794, 1800-1812
U.S. House of Rep from S.C. 1793-1795
Cannon Detail Atop the Fort Pickens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
7. Cannon Detail Atop the Fort Pickens Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,611 times since then and 206 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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