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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Boston in Suffolk County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

A Riot, the Massacre, and the Tea Party

 
 
A Riot, the Massacre, and the Tea Party Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
1. A Riot, the Massacre, and the Tea Party Marker
Inscription. From 1769-1776 Boston was the flashpoint for events leading up to the American Revolution. On February 22, 1770, a crowd gathered around the house and shop of a Tory sympathizer and customs agent, Ebenezer Richardson. When they started pelting the house with snowballs and debris, Richardson shot his gun into the crowd, hitting 12-year-old Christopher Snyder (or Christian Seider) in the stomach. Snyder died that night and was buried at Granary after a large funeral procession orchestrated by Samuel Adams. Black poetess, Phillis Wheatley (Sign #7), wrote an elegy entitled “On the death of Mr. Seider Murder’d by Richardson.” Eleven days later on March 5, 1770, British troops shot and killed five demonstrators in what was dubbed “The Boston Massacre.” The victims were Crispus Attucks, an African-American seaman; James Caldwell, also a seaman; Patrick Carr, who worked for a breeches-maker; Samuel Gray; and Samuel Maverick, an apprentice ivory-turner. The funeral march to Granary Burying Ground was said to have been witnessed by 10,000 to 12,000 people. Snyder and the “Boston Massacre” victims are buried together in Tomb 204.

On the evening of December 16, 1773, about 50 “Sons of Liberty” snuck onto three ships anchored at Griffen’s Wharf
Marker in Granary Burying Ground image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
2. Marker in Granary Burying Ground
and emptied over 300 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest the Tea Act of 1773. While the identities of those at the “Tea Party” were kept secret, after the American Revolution many came forward, including Joseph Shed (d. 1812) who is buried in Tomb 69 and Matthew Loring (1751-1829) who is buried in Tomb 75.

Patriots
Samuel Adams (1722-1803)
, patriot, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and Massachusetts governor, graduated from Harvard in 1736. His father was Deacon Samuel Adams, a Boston brewer and merchant. Adams inherited the family business but was a poor businessman, spending all his resources on his real interest, politics. Described by those opposed to him as “the greatest incendiary in the Empire” and by his supporters as “father of the Revolution,” Adams founded the Sons of Liberty and, with John Hancock and James Otis, led the anti-taxation protests in Boston. He held many town positions, established the Committee of Correspondence in 1762, and represented Massachusetts in the Continental Congress. In 1788 he was a Massachusetts representative to Congress, served as lieutenant governor from 1789-1793, and became governor when John Hancock died in 1793. His is buried with his first wife, Elizabeth Checkley, in her family tomb (Tomb 68).

Tomb 74 contains the remains
Grave of Samuel Adams image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
3. Grave of Samuel Adams
Here lies buried
Samuel Adams
Signer of the Declaration of Independence,
Governor of this Commonwealth,
A leader of men and an ardent Patriot
Born 1722 ... Died 1803

Massachusetts Society - Sons of the Revolution
1898
of Capt. Edward Blake (d. 1815) and his son Lt. Edward Blake Jr. (c. 1771-1817), both of whom served in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. Tomb 73 belongs to Joshua Blanchard (1693-1748), master mason and bricklayer. Blanchard laid the brick walls for the original Faneuil Hall designed by John Smibert, as well as the brickwork for the Old South Meeting House.

Robert Treat Paine (1731-1814), Tomb 88, is one of three signers of the Declaration of Independence buried at Granary. Paine was born a few blocks away on School Street and graduated from Harvard College in 1749. He was one of the prosecuting attorneys in the Boston Massacre trial in 1770, described as “a rough, sometimes overbearing opponent, the perennial legal rival of John Adams.” In 1774 Paine was chosen as one of the five Massachusetts delegates to the Continental Congress. Robert Treat Paine was Massachusetts’ first attorney general and served as a judge of the Massachusetts Supreme Court from 1790-1804.
 
Location. 42° 21.446′ N, 71° 3.669′ W. Marker is in Boston, Massachusetts, in Suffolk County. Marker is at the intersection of Tremont Street and Bromfield Street, on the left when traveling north on Tremont Street. Click for map. Marker is along the walking
Grave of James Otis image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
4. Grave of James Otis
Here lies buried
James Otis
Orator and Patriot of the Revolution
Famous for his argument
against Writs of Assistance
Born 1725 – Died 1783

Massachusetts Society – Sons of the Revolution
1808
trail in Granary Burying Ground. Marker is in this post office area: Boston MA 02108, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Samuel Adams (a few steps from this marker); Victims of the Boston Massacre (a few steps from this marker); Welcome to Granary Burying Ground (a few steps from this marker); Gravestone Carving (within shouting distance of this marker); Granary Burying Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); Tremont Temple (within shouting distance of this marker); Paul Revere Buried in this Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); Family Memorials (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Boston.
 
More about this marker. The right side of the marker contains a copy of a Boston Gazette propaganda piece from March 12, 1770 about the Boston Massacre. The right side of the marker features portraits of Samuel Adams and Robert Treat Paine. A partial map of the cemetery showing the location of the marker and several of the graves mentioned on the marker is at the bottom center.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Take a tour of the markers found along the walking trail in Boston’s Granary Burying Ground.
John Hancock's Grave image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
5. John Hancock's Grave
This memorial is erected A.D. MDCCCXCV by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to mark the grave of John Hancock.

 
Also see . . .  Granary Burying Ground. Details of the Freedom Trail from the City of Boston website. (Submitted on May 9, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesColonial EraPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Robert Treat Paine's Grave image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
6. Robert Treat Paine's Grave
Robert Treat Paine
1713 - 1814
One of the signers
of the Declaration
of Independence
Victims of the Boston Massacre image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
7. Victims of the Boston Massacre
The remains of
Samuel Gray
Samuel Maverick
James Caldwell
Crispus Attucks
and
Patrick Carr
Victims of the Boston Massacre,
March 5th, 1770,
were here interred by order of the
Town of Boston.
----------
Here also lies buried the body of
Christopher Snider
Aged 12 years,
Killed February 22nd, 1770
The innocent victim of the
struggles between the Colonists and
the Crown, which resulted in
INDEPENDENCE.
----------
Placed by Boston Chapter D.A.R.
1906.
Graves in Granary Burying Ground image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 14, 2009
8. Graves in Granary Burying Ground
The graves of the Massacre victims, Samuel Adams and Robert Treat Paine can all be seen in this photo
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,401 times since then and 186 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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