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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oakland in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Preservation Park

An Overview

 
 
Preservation Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
1. Preservation Park Marker
Inscription. Oakland in the late 19th century was a thriving waterfront city, the second largest in the state. A center of commerce and industry, it was also known for advanced notions of civic improvement. Public schools and academies, convenient transit, and an oak-studded, parklike landscape made Oakland a very desirable place to live.

Pictures of early Oakland neighborhoods are immensely appealing. Larger homes were set in sumptuous gardens, and even ordinary cottages are built along handsome tree-lines streets. A substantial picket fence or a low wall topped with decorative iron defined nearly every property. The more grand among them featured cast-stone pillars with wrought iron gates, like those at Preservation Park.

On the north side of 13th Street, five fine historic buildings stand in their original locations. Beginning in the 1970's, eleven compatible Oakland houses facing demolition were moved to the vacant block across the street. The earliest "move-ons" had been in the path of the nearby freeway that severed the natural street grid. The houses were arranged to suggest a late 19th century Oakland neighborhood, with typical fences, curving walks, and colorful plants, necessarily condensed on the limited site.

Preservation Park provides a forty-year window on Oakland architectural history. It was a particularly
Preservation Park - Entrance Gate with Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
2. Preservation Park - Entrance Gate with Marker
rich period in local building design, starting with the exuberant Victorian styles - Italianate, Stick and Queen Anne - followed by the classical refinements of the Colonial Revival, and concluding with the rustic simplicity of Craftsman architecture. Seven distinct styles are on view, dating from 1870 to 1911.

Who lived in these houses? Oaklanders, in all their diversity. From governor to saloonkeeper, painter to professor, their stories revel much about the city of the day. As downtown overtook the neighborhood, these homes were converted to rooming houses, accommodating a new generation of arrivals.

In 1988, reversing decades of neglect, the buildings were renovated and the facades restored. Preservation Park is now an innovative office center for nonprofit organizations and small businesses that further cultural, social, and environmental aims. Alive with new use, the houses continue to play a vital part in the city's history, as they have for a hundred years. The important work accomplished here by some 45 different tenants will be a force for progress well into the next century.

Preservation Park welcomes community use. Beyond its appeal as a destination and educational tool, may fine public spaces attract business gathering and classes, performances, festive occasions. T he Nile Hall auditorium, several meeting rooms and even the grounds
Preservation Park Map image. Click for full size.
April 26, 2009
3. Preservation Park Map
The map provides a physical overview of Preservation Park. The pictures following this will present the houses of Preservation Park, following along Thirteenth Street, and then Preservation Park Way, looping back onto Thirteenth Street, and then finally out onto Martin Luther King Jr. Way.
with bandstand and plaza are available for special events.

For information on renting the above facilities, or leasing office space in Preservation Park, call (510) 874-7580.

A self-guided tour and current tenant list may be obtained at the White House, located at 1233 Preservation Park Way.

Originally owned by the City of Oakland, Preservation Park was developed in cooperation with Bramalea, Incorporated, in a landmark partnership between a public agency and private enterprise. Additional original funding was provided by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

In 2005, in continuing its provenance of cooperation, Preservation Park was purchased by the Preservation Park Center, Inc., a non-profit partnership of the Tenants of Preservation Park and East Bay Asian Local Development Corporation.
 
Location. 37° 48.335′ N, 122° 16.588′ W. Marker is in Oakland, California, in Alameda County. Marker is at the intersection of Thirteenth Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Way, on the right when traveling north on Thirteenth Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oakland CA 94612, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Charles S. Greene Library (within shouting distance of this marker); First Unitarian Church of Oakland
Peter N. Remillard House (Constructed 1887) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
4. Peter N. Remillard House (Constructed 1887)
A Queen Anne-sytle Victorian. Pierre "Peter" Remillard emigrated to California from Quebec in 1854 and made his fortune in gold mining. He then founded the Remillard brick company, a major brick manufacturing company. Lillian Remillard, Peter's daughter, tutored Jack London in French here.
(about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Pardee House (about 600 feet away); Lafayette Square Timeline (about 600 feet away); Chabot Observatory (about 700 feet away); Oakland City Hall (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1946 General Strike (approx. 0.3 miles away); Latham Memorial Fountain Unveiled (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Oakland.
 
More about this marker. The marker is immediately inside the gate off of Martin Luther King Jr. Way.
 
Also see . . .
1. Preservation Park Historic Houses. Preservation Parks' history of the houses in the Park, providing a brief description and history of each. This is part the Park's larger website describing the Park and its history and development. (Submitted on May 9, 2009.) 

2. Latham - Ducel Fountain, (sculpture). The Smithsonian American Art Museum's Inventories of American Painting and Sculpture database webpage for the Latham-Ducel Fountain. (Submitted on May 9, 2009.) 

3. Preservation Park. Wikipedia article on Preservation Park. (Submitted on May 9, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Places
 
Frederick B. Ginn House (Constructed 1890) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
5. Frederick B. Ginn House (Constructed 1890)
Designed by A. Page Brown.
Nile Hall (Constructed 1911) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
6. Nile Hall (Constructed 1911)
Originally a theater/auditorium, was later used as a USO facility. Designed by Charles W. Dickey.
Thomas A.and Julia P. Thornton House (Constructed 1886-1887) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
7. Thomas A.and Julia P. Thornton House (Constructed 1886-1887)
Elisha Higgins House (Constructed 1886) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
8. Elisha Higgins House (Constructed 1886)
An Italianate-style house. Elisha Higgins was one of the principals of Higgins & Collins, a San Francisco lumber firm.
The Latham-Ducel Fountain, with the Higgins and Thornton Houses in the Background image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
9. The Latham-Ducel Fountain, with the Higgins and Thornton Houses in the Background
Featuring Diana, the moon goddess, the Latham-Ducel fountain was made in Paris of cast iron, and originally stood on the grounds of the Latham Mansion at 17th and Jackson Streets. When the mansion was torn down in 1957, the fountain was moved to Knowland Park. Later it was moved to downtown Oakland, where it was part of a memorial to Daniel P. Collins, an executive secretary to Mayor Houlihan. In the 1980's the sculpture was moved to its current location.
James White House (Constructed 1875) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
10. James White House (Constructed 1875)
Italianate-style. James White was one of the founders of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church, and publisher of the newspaper Signs of the Times, founded in 1874 and still published today.
Knox-Buckley House (Constructed 1872-1873) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
11. Knox-Buckley House (Constructed 1872-1873)
Italianate-style.
William Bartling House (Constructed 1870-71) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
12. William Bartling House (Constructed 1870-71)
An Italianate-style rowhouse.
Charles O. Park House (Constructed 1877-78) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
13. Charles O. Park House (Constructed 1877-78)
An Italianate villa. Originally located at 7th and Grove Streets.
Gertrude E. Robinson House (Constructed 1888) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
14. Gertrude E. Robinson House (Constructed 1888)
A Queen Anne-Style cottage.
Stella Standeford House (Constructed 1894) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
15. Stella Standeford House (Constructed 1894)
R.E. Bauske House (Constructed 1896) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
16. R.E. Bauske House (Constructed 1896)
A Queen Anne-style cottage. Reinhold Bauske was a dentist.
Henry O. and Tillie Delger Trowbridge House (Constructed 1885) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
17. Henry O. and Tillie Delger Trowbridge House (Constructed 1885)
Frederick William Delger had this house built for his daughter Lillie and her husband Henry Trowbridge.
Aaron Jacobs House (Constructed 1892-93) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
18. Aaron Jacobs House (Constructed 1892-93)
A Queen Anne-sytle row house, originally located on 16th Street.
William J. Raymond House (Constructed 1895-96) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
19. William J. Raymond House (Constructed 1895-96)
The original owner, William Raymond, was a professor of physics at the University of California.
George C. Hunt House (Constructed 1887-88) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 26, 2009
20. George C. Hunt House (Constructed 1887-88)
A Queen Anne-style cottage.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 2,692 times since then and 123 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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