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London in Middlesex County, Ontario — Central Canada
 

The Petition of John Ewart

 
 
The Petition of John Ewart Marker Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., May 2, 2009
1. The Petition of John Ewart Marker
Inscription.
The Petition of John Ewart of the Town of York:
Humbly Shewith:
That while your Petitioner was performing his contract for building the Court House and Gaol in the town of London, in the London District, he was located by Colonel Talbot upon two lots in the said Town of London liable to settlement Duties and upon which he has made the following...improvements -- that is to say, a framed House, 50 feet long by 30 feet wide, and 23 feet high, with a wing, 30 by 16 feet, and a back Kitchen -- 30 by 22 feet -- the House has under it a fine stone cellar, with an expensive drain from it of upwards of 100 yards in length -- also a Barn and Stable, 50 by 30 feet with 14 foot Posts -- a Well 33 feet deep -- on these lots are also an Orchard and an enclosed Garden, and he is ready to pay the fees that may be required.

        -from John Ewart's petition for a land grant, March 15, 1830.

Architect John Ewart's “improvements” to his acre on the southeast corner of Dundas and Ridout Streets had a dramatic impact on London's early history. Built to house himself and imported labourers during the construction of the courthouse, Ewart's residence became “The King's Arms Hotel” after his return to York. In 1833, the proprietors changed the hotel's name to Robinson Hall after their most prestigious
The Petition of John Ewart Marker Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., May 2, 2009
2. The Petition of John Ewart Marker
Looking east along Ridout Street.
guest, Chief Justice John Beverly Robinson, who patronized the inn while officiating at the London District Court House. Twelve years later, the Chief Justice had a first-hand view of the hotel's destruction.

The great fire of 1845 broke out in the Robinson Hall stables, engulfing buildings on both sides of Dundas Street, then rushed south, devouring buildings in its wake even across the Thames River. Robinson Hall was rebuilt as a four-storey brick structure, and remained London's most prestigious hotel for many years.
 
Location. 42° 58.945′ N, 81° 15.227′ W. Marker is in London, Ontario, in Middlesex County. Marker is on Ridout Street North, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: London, Ontario N6A 5H4, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Gaol and Courthouse, London, c.1843 (here, next to this marker); Middlesex Court House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Founding of London (within shouting distance of this marker); The Ridout Street Complex (about 180 meters away, measured in a direct line); Eldon House (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Crimean War Cannons (approx. 0.8 kilometers away); Veterans' Memorial Carillon (approx. 0.8 kilometers away); London South African War Memorial (approx. 0.8 kilometers away). Click for a list of all markers in London.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Ewart (Euart). From the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online. (Submitted on May 18, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas.) 

2. Sir John Beverley Robinson. From the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online. (Submitted on May 18, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas.) 
 
Categories. GovernmentIndustry & CommerceNotable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas. This page has been viewed 1,564 times since then and 82 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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