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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Harpers Ferry in Jefferson County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Shenandoah Pulp Factory

 
 
Shenandoah Pulp Factory Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
1. Shenandoah Pulp Factory Marker
Inscription. In 1877-1888, on the former site of the Shenandoah Canal's lower locks, Thomas Savery erected this large mill to provide wood pulp for the paper industry.

Ten turbines, arranged in pairs in the mill's five massive sluiceways, powered wood grinders, rolling machines, and other pulp-making machinery. By the 1920's, Savery's mill had the capacity to produce 15 tons of ground wood pulp daily.

After several unprofitable years, the mill closed in 1935. Within a year the building was destroyed by the record flood of 1936.

Its ruins reveal the last remnant of water-powered industry in Harpers Ferry.
 
Location. 39° 19.332′ N, 77° 44.411′ W. Marker is in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, in Jefferson County. Marker is on Shenandoah Street (Business U.S. 340), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located on Virginius Island in Harpers Ferry National Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Harpers Ferry WV 25425, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Storer College (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Heads versus Hands (about 600 feet away); Stephen Tyng Mather (about 600 feet away); Railroads
Shenandoah Pulp Factory Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
2. Shenandoah Pulp Factory Marker
(about 700 feet away); John Brown (about 700 feet away); Foundations of Freedom (about 700 feet away); The Niagara Movement at Storer College (about 700 feet away); Storer College 1867-1955 (about 800 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Harpers Ferry.
 
More about this marker. On the left is a photo of The pulp factory in the late 1800's - the building on the right.
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
Entrance to the Sluces Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
3. Entrance to the Sluces
Looking through one of the Sluces Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
4. Looking through one of the Sluces
The Exit of the Sluceways Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
5. The Exit of the Sluceways
Another View of the Sluceway Exit Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
6. Another View of the Sluceway Exit
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 714 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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