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Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Eleven - Inch Dahlgren Gun

 
 
Eleven Inch Dahlgren Gun Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
1. Eleven Inch Dahlgren Gun Marker
Inscription.
This gun was salvaged from the wreck of the U.S.S. Keokuk. The Keokuk was part of a squadron of Federal ironclad ships that attacked Fort Sumter on April 7, 1863.
 
Location. 32° 46.194′ N, 79° 55.731′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker can be reached from East Battery Street near South Battery Street. Click for map. At Battery Park - White Point Gardens. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. To the Defenders of Fort Moultrie (a few steps from this marker); Moultrie (a few steps from this marker); USS Pringle (DD-477) (a few steps from this marker); Hurricane Hugo (a few steps from this marker); The Salvaging of this Gun (within shouting distance of this marker); Ten - Inch Smooth Bore Columbaid Cannon (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Ten - Inch Smooth Bore Columbaid Cannon (within shouting distance of this marker); William Gilmore Simms (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Defenders of Charleston (within shouting distance of this marker); Stede Bonnet / Richard Worley (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
More about this marker.
Eleven Inch Dahlgren Gun Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 12, 2009
2. Eleven Inch Dahlgren Gun Marker
Marker seen at lower left corner
a Ground level Plate
 
Regarding Eleven - Inch Dahlgren Gun. Dahlgren guns were muzzle loading naval artillery designed by John A. Dahlgren USN, (November 13, 1809 – July 12, 1870) mostly used in the period of the American Civil War.
Dahlgren became known as the "father of American naval ordnance." He reached the rank of rear admiral.
 
Also see . . .
1. Dahlgren Gun. Dahlgren guns were muzzle loading naval artillery designed by Rear Admiral John A. Dahlgren USN, (November 13, 1809 – July 12, 1870) mostly used in the period of the American Civil War. (Submitted on September 23, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. USS Keokuk. Keokuk was struck by about ninety projectiles, many of which hit at or below her waterline. Her experimental armor was completely inadequate to protect her from this onslaught and she was "completely riddled." (Submitted on May 15, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. Fort Sumter > Union Siege of Fort Sumter. Union efforts to retake Charleston Harbor began on April 7, 1863, when Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont, commander of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, led the ironclad frigate New Ironsides, the tower ironclad Keokuk, and the monitors Weehawken, Passaic, Montauk,
Eleven Inch Dahlgren Gun Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 4, 2003
3. Eleven Inch Dahlgren Gun
Patapsco, Nantucket, Catskill, and Nahant in an attack against the harborís defenses. (Submitted on September 23, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable EventsWar, US Civil
 
Eleven Inch Dahlgren Gun and Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
4. Eleven Inch Dahlgren Gun and Marker
USS Keokuk Photo, Click for full size
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph #: NH 59546.
5. USS Keokuk
USS Keokuk (1862), was an ironclad steamer launched December 6, 1862 and was sunk by Confederate forces on April 8, 1863
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,614 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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