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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Groton in New London County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Construction of Fort Griswold

Stabilization and Preservation of Fort Griswold

 

—Phase 1 —

 
The Construction of Fort Griswold Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2009
1. The Construction of Fort Griswold Marker
Inscription. In November 1775, Colonel Jedeiah Elderkin was directed by the Governor and the Council of Safety “to view the circumstances of the harbor at New London and neighboring places, and consider of the most proper place and manner of fortifying the same against our enemies.” Elderkin recommended the fortification of several places in New London and Groton including the summit of the hill on Groton Heights where, “It seems nature had prepared a place to plant cannon for the protection of the harbor.”

The river-side of the fort was designed so that artillery could command the river and port. It featured two projecting bastions and a low parapet, which offered maximum flexibility in directing the fire of the fort’s cannon. The landward side of the fort, which consisted of high parapet walls and embrasures for cannon, was designed to withstand infantry assault.

Fort Griswold ranks among the nation’s best-preserved Revolutionary War fortifications. Surviving earthworks include the remains of the ramparts and the parapets of the fort. Wooden platforms, upon which infantry and cannon once stood, were located on the interior faces of the earthworks. Over time, erosion has reduced the height of the parapets.

The phased stabilization project currently underway will help to preserve the fort from further deterioration.
Markers at Fort Griswold image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2009
2. Markers at Fort Griswold
There are two markers at this location near the entrance to Fort Griswold. The Construction of Fort Griswold marker is the one on the right.
The project will include rebuilding deteriorating stone walls, growth of a dense cover of grasses to prevent soil erosion, a long-term maintenance program, and enhancing interpretation of the fort as part of the Thames River Heritage Park.
 
Location. 41° 21.267′ N, 72° 4.802′ W. Marker is in Groton, Connecticut, in New London County. Marker is on Monument Street, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Groton CT 06340, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battle of Groton Heights (here, next to this marker); Defenders of Fort Griswold • Sept • 6th 1781 • (within shouting distance of this marker); Col. William Ledyard (within shouting distance of this marker); Spanish Flagship Gun (within shouting distance of this marker); Groton Battle Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Death of Major William Montgomery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Covered Way (about 300 feet away); Ye Ebenezer Avery House (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Groton.
 
More about this marker. The left side of the marker contains a “Version of a 1781 British Plan of Fort Griswold. (Battle of Groton Heights, by William W. Harris)”.
Fort Griswold image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2009
3. Fort Griswold
Indicated on the diagram are the Magazine, Sallee-Port, a ditch leading to a battery below, the Embrazine where Maj. Montgomery fell, Barracks, Well, Points where the Light Company of Grenadiers of the 40th entered, Guns that much annoyed the British troops, Ravelin that covered the gate, a Rock not cut away which gives an entrance into the work, the fraized works, and a curtain to the angle that forms a barbette battery.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Groton Heights. Friends of Fort Griswold website. (Submitted on May 16, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Battle of Groton Heights. A detailed account of the battle and the Fort today. (Submitted on May 16, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Inside Fort Griswold image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2009
4. Inside Fort Griswold
This photo, taken inside Fort Griswold, shows where British Major William Montgomery fell (to the left of the flagpole), and where American commander Col. William Ledyard was struck down with his own sword (within fencing).
1781 British Plan of Fort Griswold from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2009
5. 1781 British Plan of Fort Griswold from Marker
Fort Griswold from the top of the Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 29, 2003
6. Fort Griswold from the top of the Monument
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,504 times since then and 77 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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