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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Thomas Smith

Governor of Carolina

 

—1693~1694 —

 
Thomas Smith Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
1. Thomas Smith Marker
Inscription.
Planter, Merchant, Surgeon, arrived in Charles Town in 1684 with his first wife, Barbara Atkins, and sons, Thomas and George. A cacique by 1690, he was created Landgrave by the Lords Proprietors on May 13, 1691. He died in his 46th year on November 16, 1694. His brick town house with a wharf on Cooper River was here on the corner of East Bay & Longitude Lane.
 
Erected 1967 by His Descendants and South Carolina Colonial Dames XVII Century. (Marker Number 10-3.)
 
Location. 32° 46.477′ N, 79° 55.637′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is at the intersection of East Bay Street and Longitude Lane, on the left when traveling north on East Bay Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 63 East Bay Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 8-10 Tradd Street (within shouting distance of this marker); 90 East Bay Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Casper Christian Schutt House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 23 Tradd Street (about 400 feet away); In Search of the Walled City
Thomas Smith Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
2. Thomas Smith Marker
(about 400 feet away); Section of parapet, or upper portion of the wall (about 400 feet away); The Walled City of Charles Town (about 400 feet away); Col. Othneil Beale's House (about 400 feet away); 26 Tradd Street (about 400 feet away); 83-107 East Bay Street   Rainbow Row (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Thomas Smith. Thomas Smith (1648–1694) was the governor of colonial South Carolina from 1693 to 1694, a planter, a merchant and a surgeon. (Submitted on September 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Thomas Smith, Governor of Carolina Province 1693 to 1694. Originally, the Lords Proprietors had selected Thomas Smith, one of the wealthiest men in the province, to replace Governor James Colleton. (Submitted on December 10, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Cacique. Cacique (female form: Cacica) is a title derived from the Taíno word for the pre-Columbian chiefs or leaders of tribes in the Bahamas, Greater Antilles, and the northern Lesser Antilles. (Submitted on September 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Thomas Smith Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
3. Thomas Smith Marker
 

4. Cassiques. Cassiques (junior) and Landgraves (senior) were intended to be a fresh new system of titles of specifically American lesser nobility, created for hereditary representatives in a proposed upper house of a bicameral Carolina assembly. (Submitted on September 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Lords Proprietor > Carolina. There were eight Lords Proprietor of the Province of Carolina (by 1729, when seven of their descendants, all but the heir of Carteret, sold their shares to the Crown, it was split into two provinces: North and South Carolina). (Submitted on September 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraGovernmentSettlements & Settlers
 
Thomas Smith Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
4. Thomas Smith Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,363 times since then and 210 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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