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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Thirteen Inch Mortar

 
 
Thirteen Inch Mortar Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 12, 2009
1. Thirteen Inch Mortar Marker
Inscription.
Thirteen Inch Mortar
1863-1865
Used by Union Army - Siege of Charleston

 
Location. 32° 46.169′ N, 79° 55.816′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Murray Boulevard, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Between East Battery and King Streets in Battery Park -White Point Gardens facing Ashley River. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Thirteen - Inch Mortar (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War Torpedo Boatmen Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Thirteen - Inch Mortar (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Thirteen - Inch Mortar (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Stede Bonnet / Richard Worley (about 300 feet away); William Gilmore Simms (about 300 feet away); Still On Patrol (about 300 feet away); Seven - Inch Banded Brooks Rifle (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
Regarding Thirteen Inch Mortar. 13-inch seacoast and Navy mortar, Model of 1861. Total length, 56.5 inches; weight, 17,250 pounds; total production,
This Thirteen Inch Mortar Marker seen on lower step Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 12, 2009
2. This Thirteen Inch Mortar Marker seen on lower step
on face,a worn Foundry Mark reads Fort Pitt. the date is illegible, sight or touch
162; known survivors, 27.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Blue and Gray Trail - Siege of Charleston. (Submitted on May 17, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
2. Wikipedia entry- Siege. The Second Battle of Charleston Harbor (or the Siege of Charleston Harbor, Siege of Fort Wagner, or Battle of Morris Island) (Submitted on May 17, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Use of the Mortars
According to historian/reporter Warren Ripley, in his collected articles The Battery: Charlestown, South Carolina, the mortars in the battery cannot be accurately traced to wartime service around the city. The Federals did use a battery of 13-inch mortars to bombard Fort Sumter and several others on navy ships. But the registry numbers were not recorded at the time. The mortars on display arrived around 1874, and were used in the coastal defenses around Charleston until 1901. At that time, the mortars were placed on display at the battery.
    — Submitted May 18, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 738 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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