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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sullivans Island in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Fort Sullivan

 
 
Battle of Fort Sullivan Marker - Side A image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
1. Battle of Fort Sullivan Marker - Side A
Inscription.
[Side A]
On June 28, 1776, a British and Loyalist force seeking to capture Charleston advanced to Sullivan's Island with 9 ships and 2,500-3,000 infantry. The American defenders, 435 men under Col. William Moultrie of the 2nd S.C. Regiment, occupied a fort nearby, built from plametto logs. Still unfinished when the fighting began, it is sometimes referred to as "Fort Sullivan" in contemporary accounts.
(Continued on other side)

[Side B]
(Continued from other side)
As Adm. Peter Parker's ships shelled the fort its log walls absorbed or deflected the British shells and the Americans lost only 37 men killed or wounded. Moultrie's shells damaged every ship, inflicted 219 losses, and forced Parker's withdrawal. A British land attack at Breach Inlet also failed. The first major Patriot victory of the war also gave S.C. its nickname, "The Palmetto State."
 
Erected 2005 by Fort Sullivan Chapter, National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. (Marker Number 10-46.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 32° 45.55′ N, 79° 
Battle of Fort Sullivan Marker - Side B image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
2. Battle of Fort Sullivan Marker - Side B
51.398′ W. Marker is in Sullivans Island, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Poe Avenue near Palmetto Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located at Fort Moultrie. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1304 Poe Avenue, Sullivans Island SC 29482, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. CS H.L. Hunley (here, next to this marker); This is Sullivan's Island (a few steps from this marker); 10-Inch Columbiad, Rifled and Banded (within shouting distance of this marker); 10-Inch Columbiad (Rodman) (within shouting distance of this marker); 7-Inch Brooke Rifle, Triple Banded (within shouting distance of this marker); 8-inch Parrott (200 Pounder) (within shouting distance of this marker); 10-Inch Confederate Columbiad (within shouting distance of this marker); 13-Inch Seacoast Mortar (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sullivans Island.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Fort Sullivan. Includes additional links for more detailed information on the battle, its background, and aftermath. (Submitted on May 20, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.) 

2. The Battle of Fort Sullivan. The square-shaped Fort Sullivan made up of only the completed seaward wall, with walls made from Palmetto logs 16 feed wide and
Battle of Fort Sullivan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 3, 2013
3. Battle of Fort Sullivan Marker
filled with sand, which rose 10 feed above the wooden platforms for the artillery. A hastly erected plaisde of thick planks helped guard the powder magazine and unfinished northern walls. A assortment of 31 hard-to-get cannon rangeing from 9- and 12-pounders as well as a few English 18-pounders and French 26-pounders dotted the front and rear walls. (Submitted on May 20, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Battle of Fort Sullivan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
4. Battle of Fort Sullivan Marker
Site of Fort Sullivan image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
5. Site of Fort Sullivan
In 1798 a brick masonry fortification, named Fort Moultrie, was erected at the site of "Fort Sullivan."
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,147 times since then and 89 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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