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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Still On Patrol

USS Amberjack Memorial

 
 
Still On Patrol image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 2009
1. Still On Patrol
Inscription.
Still On Patrol
–– • ––
U.S. Navy Submarines
paid heavily for
their success in
World War II.
A total of
374 Officers and
3131 men are on
board these 52
U.S. Submarines
still on "patrol."

(Relief of Submarine firing a torpedo)

(left column names)
Albacore •  Amberjack •  Argonaut •  Barbel •  Bonefish  •  Bullhead •  Capelin •  Cisco •  Corvina •  Darter •  Dorado  •  Escolar •  Flier •  Golet •  Grampus •  Grayback •  Grayling •  Grenadier •  Growler •  Grunion •  Gudgeon •  Harder •  Herring •  Kete •  Lagarto •  Perch • 
( Right column names)
Pickerel •  Pompano •  Robalo •  Runner •  R-12 •  Scamp •  Scorpion •  Sculpin •  Sealion •  Seawolf •  Shark I •  Shark II •  Snook •  S-26 •  S-27 •  S-28 •  S-36 •  S-39 •  S-44 •  Tang •  Trigger •  Triton •  Trout •  Tulibee •  Wahoo • 

We shall never forget that it was our submarines that held the lines against the enemy while our fleets replaced losses and repaired wounds.
Fleet Admiral C.W. Nimitz, U.S.N.

I can assure you that they went down fighting and that their brothers who survived them took a grim toll of our savage enemy to avenge their deaths.
Vice
Still On Patrol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 2009
2. Still On Patrol Marker
Admiral C.A. Lookwood, Jr., U.S.N.
Commander Submarine Force 1943-1946

P.F.S. 59

U.S.S. Amberjack (SS 219)
Memorial

(Lower Plaque)
Crew

( Left column )
Name      Rate
Allmon, M.W.      Momm1•  Baker, W.A., Jr.       RM3 •   Bannister, P.S.     Momm2 • Barr, L.V.     F1 •     Bartoli, R.(n)     S1 •  Blauvelt, R.P.      LT •   Bole, J.A., Jr.      LCDR •  Bolze, J.F.      FC1 • Brant, H.J.      SC2 •  Brossy, H.E.      LCDR • Brousseau, M.J.      SC2 •  Buchan, W.N.      EM1 • Cacciato,D.,Jr.(n)      TM3 •  Caldwell, L.J.D.      SD2 • Chaffin, E.E.     F2 •  Cheney, J.F.      LT • Clark, B.L.     TM1 •  Coleman, J.L.     GM2 • Coultas, W.E.     Momm2 • Davis, E.S. Davis, L.C.      EM3 • De Groot, J. (n)     F2 •   Demler, A.M.     ENS •  Ducharme, D. ((n)      QM3 • Eastman,A.G.H.     TM2 •  Everett, E.J.     RT1 •   Gillard, G.H. Jr     F3 •  Gosciniak, T. (n)     Momm2 • Hamilton, J.W.     Momm2 • Henderson, L.G.      EM2 • Hiatt, D.L.      EM3 • Hill, W.M.O.    F2 •   Jackson, V.T.     Momm2 • James, H.E.      EM2 • Jeter, W.L.      SM3 • Jewell, T.E.      CSM •

( Right column )
Name      Rate
Kingston, F.P.     Momm2 • Koreyva, V.J.     Momm1 • Lester, R.L.     S2 •  Levesque, R.A.      EM2
Lower Plaque, Crew of the USS Amberjack image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 2009
3. Lower Plaque, Crew of the USS Amberjack
• Lewellyn, J.E.     ENS •  Lord, H.S.,Jr      LTJG • Lucas, J.B.,Jr     Momm2 • Macy, M.R.      RM2 • Massey, A.R.     MA2 • McDaniel, R. (n)     S1 •   McLean, R.A.      TM1 • Montague, W. (n)     MA1 • Muir, C.R.      CTM • Ogilvie, H.B.     TM2 • Ouzts, C.M.,Jr.    Momm1 • Pavlin, B.F.      EM2 • Pisarski, H. (n)Ranger, J.A.      RM2 • Rakyta, J.G.     S1 •  Runkowski, C.L.     TM3 • Ryall, L.R.    Momm1 • Sallee, C.K.     SC1 • Seidell,D.R.      ENS • Smorol, P.P.     F2 •   Spierer, E.R.     S1 •  Springsteen, C.A.     S1 •   Stern, R.G.,Jr.     LTJG • St. John, F.T.     Y1 •   Taylor, H.A.      EM2 • Thurman, I.H.     F1 •   Tobin, W.J.      EM2 • Trask, P.B.      TM2 • Ullstrom, J.H.     S2 •  Ward, A.G.      EM3 • Wilson, E.L.    F3 •  Winquist, H.C.A.    Momm1 •

Swampfox Chapter of South Carolina, United States Submarine Veterans of World War II, 1988
 
Erected 1988 by Swampfox Chapter of South Carolina, United States Submarine Veterans of World War II.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Still On Patrol marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.177′ N, 79° 55.88′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Murray Boulevard east of King Street, on the
Still On Patrol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2013
4. Still On Patrol Marker
left when traveling south. Click for map. Monument is located in the southwest corner of White Point Gardens (or the Battery). Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. USS Hobson Tribute (within shouting distance of this marker); Thirteen Inch Mortar (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Thirteen - Inch Mortar (about 400 feet away); Civil War Torpedo Boatmen Memorial (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Thirteen - Inch Mortar (about 500 feet away); Stede Bonnet / Richard Worley (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Thirteen - Inch Mortar (about 600 feet away); William Gilmore Simms (about 600 feet away); Seven - Inch Banded Brooks Rifle (about 700 feet away); The Colonel James English House (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. USS Amberjack, a 1525-ton Gato class submarine. Dept. Of The Navy-Naval Historical Center (Submitted on May 21, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. USS Albacore (SS-218). USS Albacore (SS-218) was a Gato-class submarine which served in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II, winning four Presidential Unit Citations and nine
Still On Patrol Monument<br>White Point Park (The Battery)<br>Looking East image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
5. Still On Patrol Monument
White Point Park (The Battery)
Looking East
battle stars for her service. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. USS Amberjack (SS-219). USS Amberjack (SS-219) was a Gato-class submarine, the first United States Navy ship named for the amberjack, a vigorous sport fish found in the western Atlantic from New England to Brazil. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. USS Argonaut (SM-1). USS Argonaut (SF-7/SM-1/APS-1/SS-166 (Never formally held this classification)) was a submarine of the United States Navy, the first ship to carry the name. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. USS Bardel (SS-316). USS Barbel (SS-316), a Balao-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the barbel, a cyprinoid fish, commonly called a minnow or carp. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. USS Bonefish (SS-223). USS Bonefish (SS-223) was a Gato-class submarine, the first United States Navy ship to be named for the bonefish, which is a name for the ladyfish, dogfish, and sturgeon. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. USS Bullhead (ss-332). USS Bullhead (SS-332), a Balao-class submarine, was
USS Albacore (22-218) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1942
6. USS Albacore (22-218)
the very last US Navy ship sunk by enemy action during World War II, probably on the same day that the first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. USS Capelin (SS-289). USS Capelin (SS-289), a Balao-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the capelin, a small fish of the smelt family. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. USS Cisco (SS-290). USS Cisco (SS-290), a Balao-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the cisco, a whitefish of the Great Lakes. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. USS Corvina (SS-226). USS Corvina (SS-226), a Gato-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the corvina, any of various important food fishes related to the weakfish and the croaker of the Atlantic coast. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

11. USS Darter (SS-227). USS Darter (SS-227), a Gato-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the darter. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

12. USS Dorado (SS-248)
USS Amberjack image. Click for full size.
Dept. Of The Navy , Naval Historical Center
7. USS Amberjack
NH# 98486 USS Amberjack (SS-219) off Groton CT, 30 May 1942
. USS Dorado (SS-248), a Gato-class submarine, was the first submarine of the United States Navy to be named for the dorado, also known as the dolphinfish or mahi-mahi. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

13. USS Escolar (SS-294). USS Escolar (SS-294), a Balao-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the escolar, a predatory fish of the open ocean related to the mackerels and tuna. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

14. USS Flier (SS-250). USS Flier (SS-250), a Gato-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the flier, a round sunfish widely known in the United States. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

15. USS Golet (SS-361). USS Golet (SS-361), a Gato-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the golet, a California trout. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

16. USS Grampus (SS-207). USS Grampus (SS-207), a Tambor-class submarine, was the sixth ship of the United States Navy to be named for a member of the dolphin family (Delphinidae): Grampus griseus, also known as
USS <i>Argonaut</i> (SM-1) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy
8. USS Argonaut (SM-1)
Risso's dolphin. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

17. USS Grayback (SS-208). USS Grayback (SS-208), a Tambor-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the lake herring. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

18. USS Grayling (SS-209). USS Grayling (SS-209), a Tambor-class submarine, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the grayling, a fresh-water game fish closely related to the trout. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

19. USS Grenadier (SS-210). USS Grenadier (SS-210), a Tambor-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the grenadier fish, relatives of cod that are very common in bathyal and abyssal habitats. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

20. USS Growler (SS-215). USS Growler (SS-215), a Gato-class submarine, was the third ship of the United States Navy named for the growler, a large-mouth black bass. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

21. USS Grubion (SS-216). USS Grunion (SS-216) was a Gato-class submarine that was sunk at Kiska, Alaska, during World War II.
USS Bonefish (SS-223) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1943
9. USS Bonefish (SS-223)
(Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

22. USS Gudgeon SS-211. USS Gudgeon (SS-211), a Tambor-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the gudgeon. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

23. USS Harder (SS-257). USS Harder (SS-257), a Gato-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the harder, a fish of the mullet family found off South Africa. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

24. USS Herring (SS-233). USS Herring (SS-233), a Gato-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the herring, a type of small oily fish found in the temperate, shallow waters of the North Atlantic. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

25. USS Kete (SS-369). USS Kete (SS-369), a Balao-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the kete, the foureye butterflyfish Chaetodon capistratus. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

26. USS Lagarto (SS-371). USS Lagarto (SS-371), a Balao-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States
USS Bullhead (SS-332) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1944
10. USS Bullhead (SS-332)
Navy to be named for the lagarto, a lizard fish. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

27. USS Perch (SS-176). USS Perch (SS-176) was a Porpoise-class submarine of the United States Navy, the first Navy ship to be named for the perch. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

28. USS Pickerel (SS-177). USS Pickerel (SS-177), a Porpoise-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the pickerel, a young or small pike. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

29. USS Pompano (SS-181). USS Pompano (SS-181), a United States Porpoise-class submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for the pompano. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

30. USS Robalo (SS-273). USS Robalo (SS-273), a Gato-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the róbalo or common snook. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

31. USS Runner (SS-275). USS Runner (SS-275) was a Gato-class submarine, the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the runner, an amberfish inhabiting subtropical waters, so called
USS Capelin (SS-289) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1943
11. USS Capelin (SS-289)
for its rapid leaps from the water. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

32. USS r-12 (SS-89). USS R-12 (SS-89) was an R-class coastal and harbor defense submarine of the United States Navy. (Submitted on September 20, 2011.) 

33. USS Scamp (SS-277. USS Scamp (SS-277), a Gato-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the scamp, a member of the Serranidae family. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

34. USS Scorpion (SS-278). USS Scorpion (SS-278) — a Gato-class submarine — was the fifth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the scorpion, an arachnid having an elongated body and a narrow segmented tail bearing a venomous sting at the tip. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

35. USS Sculpin (SS-191). USS Sculpin (SS-191), a Sargo-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the sculpin. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

36. USS Sealion (SS-195). USS Sealion (SS-195), a Sargo-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the sea lion, any of several large, eared seals native
USS Cisco (SS-290) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1943
12. USS Cisco (SS-290)
to the Pacific. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

37. USS Seawolf (SS-197). USS Seawolf (SS-197), a Sargo-class submarine, was the second submarine of the United States Navy named for the seawolf. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

38. USS Shark (SS174). USS Shark (SS-174) was a Porpoise-class submarine, the fifth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the shark. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

39. USS Shark (SS-314). USS Shark (SS-314), a Balao-class submarine, was the sixth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the shark, a large marine predator. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

40. USS Snook (SS-279). USS Snook (SS-279), a Gato-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the common snook, an Atlantic marine fish that is bluish-gray above and silvery below a black lateral line. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

41. USS s-26 (SS-131). USS S-26 (SS-131) was an S-class submarine of the United States Navy. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

42. USS s-27 (SS-132).
USS Corvina (SS-226) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1943
13. USS Corvina (SS-226)
USS S-27 (SS-132) was a S-class submarine of the United States Navy. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

43. USS s-28 (SS-133). USS S-28 (SS-133) was a S-class submarine of the United States Navy. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

44. USS s-36 (141). USS S-36 (SS-141) was a S-class submarine in the United States Navy. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

45. USS s-39 (SS-144). USS S-39 (SS-144) was a United States NavyS-class submarine that saw combat in the Pacific Ocean during World War II. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

46. USS s-44 (SS-155). USS S-44 (SS-155) was a third-group (S-42) S-class submarine of the United States Navy. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

47. USS Tang (SS-306). USS Tang (SS-306) was a Balao-class submarine of World War II. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

48. USS Trigger (SSo237). USS Trigger (SS-237) was a Gato-class submarine, the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the triggerfish, any of numerous deep-bodied fishes of warm seas having an anterior
USS Darter (SS-227) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1943
14. USS Darter (SS-227)
dorsal fin with two or three stout erectile spines. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

49. USS Triton (SS-201). USS Triton (SS-201), a Tambor-class submarine, was the first submarine and third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Triton. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

50. USS Trout (SS0202). USS Trout (SS-202) was a United States Navy Tambor-class submarine, serving in the Pacific from 1941 to 1944. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

51. USS Tullibee (SS-284). USS Tullibee (SS-284), a Gato-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the tullibee, a whitefish of central and northern North America. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

52. USS Wahoo (SS-238). USS Wahoo (SS-238) was a Gato-class submarine, the first United States Navy ship to be named for the wahoo, a dark blue food fish of Florida and the West Indies. (Submitted on September 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, World II
 
USS Dorado (SS-248) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1943
15. USS Dorado (SS-248)
USS Escolar (SS-294) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1944
16. USS Escolar (SS-294)
USS Flier (SS-250) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1944
17. USS Flier (SS-250)
USS Golet (SS-361) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1943
18. USS Golet (SS-361)
USS Grampus (SS-207) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1941
19. USS Grampus (SS-207)
USS Grayback (SS-208) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1941
20. USS Grayback (SS-208)
USS Grayling (SS-209) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1941
21. USS Grayling (SS-209)
USS Grenadier (SS-210) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1940
22. USS Grenadier (SS-210)
USS Growler (SS-215) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1941
23. USS Growler (SS-215)
USS Grunion (SS-216) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1941
24. USS Grunion (SS-216)
USS Gudgeon (SS-211) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1941
25. USS Gudgeon (SS-211)
USS Harder (SS-257) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1944
26. USS Harder (SS-257)
USS Herring (SS-233) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1942
27. USS Herring (SS-233)
USS Kete (SS-369) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1944
28. USS Kete (SS-369)
USS Lagarto (SS-371) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1944
29. USS Lagarto (SS-371)
USS Perch (SS-176) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy
30. USS Perch (SS-176)
USS Pickerel (SS-177) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1943
31. USS Pickerel (SS-177)
USS Pompano (SS-181) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1938
32. USS Pompano (SS-181)
Uss R-12 (ss-89) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy
33. Uss R-12 (ss-89)
USS Scamp (SS-277) image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, 1944
34. USS Scamp (SS-277)
USS Scorpion (SS-278) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
35. USS Scorpion (SS-278)
USS Sculpin (SS-191) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy Photo # NH 97309
36. USS Sculpin (SS-191)
USS Sealion (SS-195) image. Click for full size.
By PD-USGov-Military-Navy
37. USS Sealion (SS-195)
USS Seawolf (SS-197) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy photo # NH 99549.
38. USS Seawolf (SS-197)
USS Shark (SS-314) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
39. USS Shark (SS-314)
USS Shark SS-174) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy Photo # NH 42075
40. USS Shark SS-174)
USS Snook (SS-279) image. Click for full size.
By U.S. Navy Photograph, # NH 98380
41. USS Snook (SS-279)
Uss S-26 (ss-131) image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
42. Uss S-26 (ss-131)
Uss S-28 (ss-133) image. Click for full size.
By PD-USGov-Military-Navy
43. Uss S-28 (ss-133)
Uss S-28 (ss-133) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
44. Uss S-28 (ss-133)
Uss S-36 (ss-141) image. Click for full size.
Naval Historical Center Photo # NH 51827
45. Uss S-36 (ss-141)
Uss S-39 (ss-144) image. Click for full size.
By PD-USGov-Military-Navy
46. Uss S-39 (ss-144)
Uss S-44 (ss-155) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
47. Uss S-44 (ss-155)
Uss S-44 (ss-155) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
48. Uss S-44 (ss-155)
USS Tang (SS-306) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
49. USS Tang (SS-306)
USS Trigger (SS-237) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
50. USS Trigger (SS-237)
USS Triton (SS-201) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
51. USS Triton (SS-201)
USS Trout (SS-202) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
52. USS Trout (SS-202)
USS Tullibee (SS-284) image. Click for full size.
By US Navy
53. USS Tullibee (SS-284)
USS Wahoo (SS-238) image. Click for full size.
By PD-USGov-Military-Navy, 1943
54. USS Wahoo (SS-238)
 
 
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