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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Perrysburg in Wood County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

General William Henry Harrison

 
 
General William Henry Harrison Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 21, 2009
1. General William Henry Harrison Marker
Inscription. General William Henry Harrison, commander of the Army of the West, selected this site in February 1813, and on it erected Fort Meigs as a defense against the military operations of the English, with whom the United States was then at war.

On April 26th of the same year, this fort was besieged by the British and their Indian allies. After a brave defense the siege was raised on May 9th. On July 20th the enemy renewed the attack but was again defeated.

These victories were a great factor in turning back the tide of British invasion and materially aided in the protection and preservation of Ohio and the territories of the Northwest.
 
Erected 1908 by the State of Ohio.
 
Location. 41° 33.165′ N, 83° 39.099′ W. Marker is in Perrysburg, Ohio, in Wood County. Marker is on West Indiana Avenue (Ohio Route 65) near Fort Meigs Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. This historical marker is located inside of a reconstructed War of 1812 fort, on the high ground over looking the Maumee River, on the Perrysburg side of the river, within easy view of the Maumee-Perrysburg Bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Perrysburg OH 43551, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking
Fort Meigs Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 21, 2009
2. Fort Meigs Memorial
The General William Henry Harrison historical marker is attached to the Fort Meigs Memorial Monument.
distance of this marker. Fort Meigs (here, next to this marker); Major Amos Stoddard (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Meigs / Construction (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Meigs / Introduction 4 (about 600 feet away); Fort Meigs / Introduction 3 (about 600 feet away); Fort Meigs / Introduction 2 (about 600 feet away); Fort Meigs / Introduction 1 (about 700 feet away); The Indian Wars (about 800 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Perrysburg.
 
More about this marker. This historical marker is actually attached to a very visible obelisk memorial marker situated in the middle of the reconstructed Fort Meigs, on property owned and maintained by the Ohio Historical Society. In addition to this historical marker and the reconstructed fort the Ohio Historical Society also maintains a staffed museum, numerous outdoor display/interpretation panels, and frequently they utilize historical interactors at this facility.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. William Henry Harrison. At a web site sponsored by "Touring Ohio" one can find some general information regarding
Fort Meigs image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 21, 2009
3. Fort Meigs
View of Fort Meigs from across the Maumee River, as the Bristish would have seen it.
William Henry Harrison, including information regarding his role as commander of the American Army of the Northwest. (Submitted on May 23, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Fort Meigs History. Also at the web site sponsored by "Touring Ohio" is a web-page that provides background information regarding the history of Fort Meigs (and the role of General William Henry Harrison in that history). (Submitted on May 23, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryNative AmericansNotable PersonsWar of 1812
 
Fort Meigs image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 21, 2009
4. Fort Meigs
View of Fort Meig's Grand Battery
Fort Meigs image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 21, 2009
5. Fort Meigs
View of historical reenactors setting up camp in preparation for reenacting life in General Harrison's army during the War of 1812.
General William Henry Harrison image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
6. General William Henry Harrison
This c. 1813 painting by Rembrandt Peale hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC

“The first battle of the War of 1812 actually occurred in 1811, with the Battle of Tippecanoe in the Indiana wilderness. As governor of the territory, William Henry Harrison faced increased resistance from Indian tribes forced from their homes by new settlers. Harrison met with Shawnee warrior chief Tecumseh at a tense council that nearly ended in violence and led in part to Tecumseh's alliance with the British during the subsequent war. With tensions rising, Tecumseh's brother Tenskwatawa (the Prophet) attacked Harrison's forces near Tippecanoe. The surprise strike resulted in heavy casualties for Harrison; however, the Indians left the field and Harrison then destroyed Tecumseh's stronghold, Prophet's Town, claiming the victory. A year later, Harrison. commanded the American forces at the Battle of the Thames, where Tecumseh was killed. In 1840 the slogan ‘Tippecanoe and Tyler too!’ propelled Harrison to the presidency.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 920 times since then and 80 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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