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Fredericksburg in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Confederate Earthworks

The Battle of Fredericksburg

 
 
Confederate Earthworks Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 23, 2009
1. Confederate Earthworks Marker
Inscription. Twisting through the woods one hundred yards ahead of you are two well-preserved lines of earthworks constructed by Confederate forces in the winter of 1862-1863. General Robert E. Lee had ordered his troops to build the trenches in anticipation of a Union Crossing of the Rappahannock River the following spring. When first built, the works stood two and one-half feet high with a ditch of like depth in the rear, allowing soldiers to stand without exposing themselves to enemy fire.

On the crest of the ridge stand two sets of earthworks that sheltered Confederate artillery. Shooting over the heads of the riflemen in the trenches below, the cannon could sweep the plain between here and the Rappahannock River with a deadly fire.

“The greatest destruction and change in the appearance of the country is from the long lines of trenches and the redoubts which crown every hillside from ten miles above Fredericksburg to twenty miles below. The world has never seen such a fortified position.” Major Sandie Pendleton, CSA staff officer
 
Location. 38° 14.474′ N, 77° 25.28′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is at the intersection of Jim Morris Road and Schumann Street, on the right when traveling
Confederate Earthworks Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 23, 2009
2. Confederate Earthworks Marker
south on Jim Morris Road. Click for map. This marker is located at the entrance to the Pelham’s Crossing subdivision. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22408, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Gallant Pelham (here, next to this marker); The Winter Line (a few steps from this marker); Colonial Post Office (approx. 0.6 miles away); Fredericksburg Campaign (approx. ¾ mile away but has been reported missing); a different marker also named The Gallant Pelham (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named The Gallant Pelham (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Battle of Fredericksburg (approx. 0.8 miles away); Stuart and Pelham (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
More about this marker. On the right is a map of the immediate area showing the location of Confederate earthworks. On the lower right is a postwar photograph of similar entrenchments. It carries the caption, "The Confederate gun emplacements in the woods ahead of you looked much like those shown in this postwar image. Notice the slight depressions visible on either side of the man with the telescope. Called embrasures, these openings allowed artillerists to fire through the works with minimal exposure."
 
Also see . . .
Pelham's Crossing Markers Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 23, 2009
3. Pelham's Crossing Markers

1. CWSAC Battle Summary. Fredericksburg I. (Submitted on May 24, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park. Battle of Fredericksburg. (Submitted on May 24, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

3. CWSAC Battle Summary. Fredericksburg II. (Submitted on May 24, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Ridge Line Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, July 25, 2009
4. Ridge Line
The earthworks mentioned on the marker extend across a wooded ridge line just behind the subdivision. The works are located under the brush to the right of the road.
Pelham's Crossing subdivision Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 23, 2009
5. Pelham's Crossing subdivision
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,093 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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