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Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Savannah in the American Revolution

 
 
Savannah in the American Revolution Marker is found along the Riverwalk on River St, image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 2009
1. Savannah in the American Revolution Marker is found along the Riverwalk on River St,
Inscription. When political dissent evolved into armed revolution in America, Oglethorpe's colony had only been in existence for four decades. Georgians confronted the same political and economic issues associated with British taxation as the more established colonies. A general deterioration of Royal authority intensified when news of armed resistance at Lexington and Concord (Massachusetts) reached Savannah in May 1775. On July 4, 1775, Georgia's second provincial congress convened to determine the colony's future. Delegates decided that Georgia would join the other 12 colonies to unite against the British Crown.

(Pictures included ;Sons of Liberty at Tondee's Savannah Tavern,"American Liberty"- American Flag Flown Over Georgia & HMS Rose)

HMS Rose was a 6th rate frigate stationed in Savannah during the British Occupation. The Rose was in the river below Savannah to obstruct navigation when the French fleet arrived in September 1779.
Battle of the Rice Boats
In January 1776, Royal navy vessels entered the Savannah River. Captain Andrew Barkley only proposed to purchase supplies, but Savannah Whigs flatly refused. Barkley sailed upriver and through Back River capturing 26 merchantmen at the northwest end of Hutchinson Island. Georgia malitia frustrated the raid,
Count Pulaski, Gen. Benjaman Lincoln, and Count Charles-Henri d' Estaing image. Click for full size.
Savannah in the American Revolution Marker
2. Count Pulaski, Gen. Benjaman Lincoln, and Count Charles-Henri d' Estaing
but the rice boats were captured. Americans torched several in hopes that the burning craft would drift into the British anchorage. Despite their valiant efforts, Barkley made his way downstream through the Back River with the prize vessels in tow.
British Attack on Savannah December 28, 1778
By 1778, the British altered their strategy to subdue the American rebellion. An army of over 3,000 British regulars, German mercenaries and American Loyalists sailed from New York to capture Savannah. Under the command of Lt. Col. Archibald Campbell, the expedition would use the city as a base of operations against Patriot forces in the South. The British advance into Savannah was virtually uncontested by the surprised Georgia Continentals. For the duration of the war in America, Savannah was an occupied city.
American Attempt to Liberate Savannah
On September 11, 1779, American forces under command of Gen. Benjamin Lincoln and Count Casimir Pulaski rendezvoused northwest of Savannah. The following day, Count Charles-Henri d' Estaing's French fleet debarked 3,200 French, Irish and Haitian soldiers who marched on Savannah to support the American attack. Allied forces chose to lay siege to the city and and unleashed a five- day bombardment. Unfortunately, there was little damage to the British defenses. Savannah remained under British
Savannah in the American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
Savannah in the American Revolution Marker
3. Savannah in the American Revolution Marker
control for more than six months after Gen. Cornwallis surrendered to Gen. George Washington at Yorktown, Virginia in October 1781.

 
Erected 2009 by U.S. Dept. Of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, Georgia Dept. of Transportation. (Marker Number 4.)
 
Location. 32° 4.904′ N, 81° 5.432′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on East River Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located between Drayton St. Ramp & Abercorn Ramp, at the River's edge. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jewish Colonists (a few steps from this marker); Savannah and the Slave Trade (within shouting distance of this marker); Savannah Waterfront (within shouting distance of this marker); African American Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Solomon's Lodge No. 1 F.& A.M. (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Chatham Artillery (about 300 feet away); Chatham Artillery's (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Chatham Artillery's (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Savannah.
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
British Attack on Savannah December 28, 1778 , (l), American Attempt to Liberate Savannah ,(u) image. Click for full size.
Savannah in the American Revolution Marker
4. British Attack on Savannah December 28, 1778 , (l), American Attempt to Liberate Savannah ,(u)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,690 times since then and 114 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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