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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Native Americans on the Georgia Coast

 
 
Native Americans on the Georgia Coast Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
1. Native Americans on the Georgia Coast Marker
Inscription. Long before Europeans arrived in the New World, the Savannah area was occupied by Native Americans. The earliest Paleoindian groups migrated into coastal Georgia as early as 10,000 B.C. The hunter-gathers took advantage of rich estuarine resources as well as upland plants and animals. During the period identified as Woodland by archaeologists, a more sedentary lifestyle was adopted. Villages became more permanent and crop cultivation contributed to subsistence along with hunting and fishing. When the first Georgia settlers arrived in Savannah in 1733, they encountered members of the Creek tribe living along the river.
Native American Pottery
( Picture included )

The Green Corn
( Picture included )

Preserving Game through Smoking
( Picture included )

Native American Canoes

Savannah River points
( Picture included )
Savannah River points were attached to wooden spears and used to kill game. This style of projectile point is associated with the Late Archaic period, 3,000 to 1,000 B.C.
First Americans Hunting Big Game
( picture included )
The first Native Americans on the Georgia coast were nomadic peoples that hunted large game such as mastodon with spears.
Native American Pottery Photo, Click for full size
Native Americans on the Georgia Coast Marker
2. Native American Pottery
Pottery first appeared in Georgia around 1,500 B.C. Forms of this pottery consisted mainly of bowls and conical jars (above). Vessels were decorated by stamping, incising and impressing the wet clay before firing. The above types represent pottery decorations associated with the Woodland and Mississippian time periods in Chatham County .

The Green Corn
As Native Americans became more sedentary, they increasingly relied on the cultivation of wild vegetables such as beans, pumpkins, sunflowers and tabacco. Part of this process was the Green Corn Festival in which Native Americans gave thanks for the harvest through games, fasting and other rites.
Hunting Smaller Game

( Picture included )
Native Americans living along the coast of Georgia and northeast Florida were documented in the 16th century by French artist Jacques le Moyne de Morgues. His illustrations depicted hunting game such as deer and alligator. Bear, bison, rabbit, turkey, squirrel and other animals also supported the rich Native American diet.

 
Erected 2009 by U.S. Dept. Of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, Georgia Dept. of Transportation. (Marker Number 12.)
 
Location. 32° 4.792′ N, 81° 5.007′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on East River Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. West of the E. Broad St. Ramp at Riverside. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1996 Olympic Yachting Cauldron (within shouting distance of this marker); Savannah's Early Economy (within shouting distance of this marker); Crossing the Savannah (within shouting distance of this marker); Savannah's Liberty Ships and the Atlantic Bridge (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct
Savannah River points Photo, Click for full size
Native Americans on the Georgia Coast Marker
3. Savannah River points
line); Old Harbor Light (about 400 feet away); Ironclads and Gunboats of the Savannah River Squadron (about 400 feet away); The Liberty (about 400 feet away); The Lions Club of Savannah (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Savannah.
 
Categories. AgricultureNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Preserving Game through Smoking Photo, Click for full size
Native Americans on the Georgia Coast Marker
4. Preserving Game through Smoking
Food was preserved through smoking the meat on racks of green willow. The frame was called barbacoa. This is the origin of the modern word barbeque.

Native American Canoes
Canoes were produced by hollowing out large logs usually from cypress. These vessels were used as fishing boats as well as to transport people and agricultural goods. Native Americans harvested a bounty of marine life. They consumed turtles, eels, mussels, clams, and oysters.
First Americans Hunting Big Game , Hunting Smaller Game Photo, Click for full size
Native Americans on the Georgia Coast Marker
5. First Americans Hunting Big Game , Hunting Smaller Game
Native Americans on the Georgia Coast Marker as seen along the Savannah River Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 24, 2009
6. Native Americans on the Georgia Coast Marker as seen along the Savannah River
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,511 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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