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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gowensville in Spartanburg County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Cherokee Foothills

National Scenic Byway

 
 
Cherokee Foothills Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, April 26, 2009
1. Cherokee Foothills Marker
Click on Photo to see an enlarged view of the map.
Inscription.
This location (Greenville/Spartanburg County Line) marks the eastern boundary between the Cherokee Nation and the Province of South Carolina from the end of the Cherokee War (1761) until 1777. The local community, Gowensville, is named for John "Buck" Gowen, a Revolutionary War soldier for whom the nearby Gowen's Fort was named. A skirmish at the fort on July 13, 1780, was the first in a series of eight confrontations leading to the tide-turning battle of the Cowpens in in January, 1781.

Foothills and mountainous regions from this location to the west for generations have been referred to as the "Dark Corner." In the early 19th Century, the name was used because of the strong Unionist leanings of the residents of this area during South Carolina's Nullification Crisis, then in the late 19th Century the connotation of the name changed because of the "white lightning" whiskey making in the area and its associated lawlessness.

Nearby historic sites are First Baptist Church (1820) and Earlesdale (1871), sites for Gowensville Seminary (1858-90), Gowensville School (1922), and Campbell's Covered Bridge (1909), the sole-surviving original covered bridge in South Carolina. For other scenic and historic points of interest, refer to the Byway map below.
 
Location. 35° 
Cherokee Foothills Marker -<br>Informational Side Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 9, 2011
2. Cherokee Foothills Marker -
Informational Side
6.985′ N, 82° 12.957′ W. Marker is in Gowensville, South Carolina, in Spartanburg County. Marker is at the intersection of Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway (State Highway 11) and New Cut Road, on the right when traveling east on Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway, Landrum SC 29356, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Campbell's Covered Bridge (approx. 3.4 miles away); a different marker also named Campbell's Covered Bridge (approx. 3.4 miles away); a different marker also named Campbellís Covered Bridge (approx. 3.4 miles away); Old Rutherford Road (approx. 4.2 miles away); B. Frank Carruth (approx. 4.4 miles away); The Block House (approx. 5.6 miles away in North Carolina); Wolfe Creek Baptist Church (approx. 5.8 miles away); Earle's Ford and Fort (approx. 6 miles away); Holly Springs Rock Wall (approx. 6.1 miles away); Holly Springs (approx. 6.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway Overview. Once known as "Keowee Path" or "Cherokee Path," this 130-mile road was used by the Cherokees and the English and French fur traders. (Submitted on June 1, 2009.) 

2. History on the Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway.
Cherokee Foothills Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, April 26, 2009
3. Cherokee Foothills
From sparkling, clear lakes and streams to rolling green hills covered in lush vegetation, the Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway offers a breathtaking sense of the Southís natural beauty. Known by the Cherokee as the “Great Blue Hills of God,” itís not hard to see why these are the hills that the ancient tribe chose as their home. (Submitted on June 1, 2009.) 

3. Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway. The Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway (SC Hwy 11) has designated as Region 1 of the South Carolina Heritage Corridor for much of its length and has been featured by National Geographic Traveler, Rand McNalley, Southern Living and several other national travel publications. (Submitted on May 22, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. South Carolina Highway 11. The Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway (S.C. 11) winds its way through the northwest corner of South Carolina. (Submitted on May 22, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Map of S.C. Highway 11. South Carolina Department of Transportation map of the scenic highway. (Submitted on May 22, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Cherokee Foothills Marker -<br>Looking East Along S.C. 11 Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 9, 2011
4. Cherokee Foothills Marker -
Looking East Along S.C. 11
Cherokee Foothills Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 9, 2011
5. Cherokee Foothills Marker
The First Baptist Church of Gowensville Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, April 26, 2009
6. The First Baptist Church of Gowensville
The Old Gowensville School Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 31, 2009
7. The Old Gowensville School
The Old Gowensville School Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 31, 2009
8. The Old Gowensville School
Campbell's Covered Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, April 26, 2009
9. Campbell's Covered Bridge
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 949 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   9. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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