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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Crossing the Savannah

 
 
Crossing the Savannah Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
1. Crossing the Savannah Marker
Inscription. Although the Savannah River provided an avenue to the sea, it also presented a barrier to overland travel and transportation. Rochester Ferry, later named Screven's Ferry, was established in 1762 and connected Savannah with a roadway in South Carolina. This location was the main river crossing site in Savannah for over 160 years. Ferries provided a method of transporting goods from South Carolina to the shipping center of Savannah. They also provided regular service for employees who worked the terminals on Hutchinson Island. In more recent history, three bridges have crossed the river at Savannah: the Seaboard Coastline Railroad Bridge, the Houlihan Bridge and the Talmadge Bridge.
Balanced Cantilever Construction
(Picture included)
A system of balanced cantilever construction permitted concrete for the new Talmadge Bridge to cast in place using form travelers. That method required critical wind analysis and temporary cable restraints capable of compensating for hurricane force winds during construction. Bridge stress tests and construction geometry were controlled to an accuracy of one inch by a water ballast system in the 200-ton travelers.
Old and New Talmadge Bridges
(Picture included)
The first Talmadge Bridge was opened in 1954 and was a 600-foot cantilever steel structure, providing
Balanced Cantilever Construction, as mentioned image. Click for full size.
Crossing the Savannah Marker
2. Balanced Cantilever Construction, as mentioned
136-foot of vertical clearance at high tide for ship traffic. In 1991, the Georgia Department of Transportation completed construction on the current $25.7 million structure. The impressive cable-stayed design suspends the roadway from two 418-foot tall H-shaped concrete pylons. The current bridge has a 185-foot vertical clearance at high tide and 1,023-foot of horizontal clearance. Georgia- Carolina Ferry Boat
(Picture included)
In the early 1900's ferry boats, such as the above "Georgia-Carolina", carried passengers and automobiles between Savannah and the Union Causeway Turnpike across the river in South Carolina. Smaller steamboat ferries also made regular trips between Savannah's river front and Hutchinson Island. These boats transported workers to jobs at the Seaboard Air Lines terminals, where goods such as lumber, naval stores, and cotton were readied for export.
Houlihan Bridge
(Picture included)
The Houlihan Bridge is located approximately six miles upriver from downtown Savannah on State Route 25.The bridge, constructed in 1922 and rehabilitated in 1954, was the first structure to provide direct overland travel between Savannah and South Carolina. With the construction of the bridge, the local economy became less dependent on boat traffic for transporting people and goods from nearby towns such as Bluffton, South Carolina.
Georgia- Carolina Ferry Boat image. Click for full size.
Crossing the Savannah Marker
3. Georgia- Carolina Ferry Boat


 
Erected 2009 by U.S. Dept. Of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, Georgia Dept. of Transportation. (Marker Number 11.)
 
Location. 32° 4.805′ N, 81° 5.04′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on East River Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. West of E. Broad St. Ramp, along the Riverside. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1996 Olympic Yachting Cauldron (a few steps from this marker); Ironclads and Gunboats of the Savannah River Squadron (within shouting distance of this marker); Native Americans on the Georgia Coast (within shouting distance of this marker); The Liberty (within shouting distance of this marker); The Lions Club of Savannah (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Harbor Light (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Georgia Medical Society (about 300 feet away); Savannah's Early Economy (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Savannah.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsIndustry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesWaterways & Vessels
 
Crossing the Savannah Marker, as seen riverside image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 28, 2009
4. Crossing the Savannah Marker, as seen riverside
The mentioned Hutchinson Island is seen across the river
Crossing the Savannah , today's Savannah Belle Ferry , crossing the Savannah River image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
5. Crossing the Savannah , today's Savannah Belle Ferry , crossing the Savannah River
The Susie King Taylor
Crossing the Savannah The New Talmadge Bridge, with remains of the old bridge image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2006
6. Crossing the Savannah The New Talmadge Bridge, with remains of the old bridge
Crossing the Savannah , Talmadge Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2006
7. Crossing the Savannah , Talmadge Bridge
The impressive cable-stayed design suspends the roadway from two 418-foot tall H-shaped concrete pylons. The current bridge has a 185-foot vertical clearance at high tide and 1,023-foot of horizontal clearance.
Crossing the Savannah , Talmadge Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
8. Crossing the Savannah , Talmadge Bridge
Crossing the Savannah - the Houlihan Bridge as seen today, as mentioned image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
9. Crossing the Savannah - the Houlihan Bridge as seen today, as mentioned
Connects Savannah area with Jasper County, and nearby towns such as Bluffton, South Carolina.
Crossing the Savannah Present-day, Railroad, Bascule bridge (CSX lines) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 11, 2007
10. Crossing the Savannah Present-day, Railroad, Bascule bridge (CSX lines)
the mentioned Seaboard Air Line Railway was created in the 1880s by the consolidation of the Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad.- SAL merged with Atlantic Coast Line Railroad in 1967 to form Seaboard Coast Line Railroad. - Seaboard Coast Line Industries and Chessie System merged in 1980 to form CSX Corporation.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,584 times since then and 172 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   8. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   9, 10. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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