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Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Shipping in the Port of Savannah

 
 
Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
1. Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker
Inscription. Savannah's port is one of the busiest in the United States. The terminals that serve the port are only surpassed in East Coast trade volume by the combined ports of New York and New Jersey. Some of the world's largest merchant vessels bring in cargos from Asia, Europe, South America, the South Pacific, and Africa and return with American commodities. Much of this freight is handled as containerized cargo. The Port of Savannah welcomes over 3,000 vessels per year.
Hapag- Lloyd Flag Maersk-Sealand Flag NYK Lines Flag
[ Picture Included ]
A variety of ships travel the Savannah River. In addition to private boats and stern-wheelers, container vessels from a number of shipping lines including Maersk- Sealand, NYK and Hapag-Lloyd, transport cargo to and from terminals.
Tugs Assist with Navigation and Docking
[Picture included}
Tugs play a critical role in the maritime commerce of Savannah. Without their meticulous guidence, large ships could not maneuver in the tight bends and turning basins of the Savannah River.
LNG Ship
[Picture included}
Downriver below Savannah, Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) carriers can be seen with their distinctive half globes aligned on deck.
Container Ship
[Picture included}
Inbound and outbound
Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker, seen along the Savannah River Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 24, 2009
2. Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker, seen along the Savannah River
ships pass within yards of River Street and provide a unique view of international vessel traffic.
Cranes at the Port of Savannah
[Picture included}
Port of Savannah exports include forestry and solid wood goods, steel, automobiles and industrial equipment. Today, these items are shipped from terminals controlled by the Georgia Ports Authority in conjunction with nearby private distribution centers owned by Target, IKEA, Heineken, Home Depot, Pier One, Wal-Mart, Kmart, Dollar Tree and Best Buy. A complex network of rail lines and direct access to the interstate supports the terminals. The port generates over 286,000 jobs and $6.3 billion in annual revenue.
Roll on-Roll off
[Picture included}
In addition to container ships, the port is equipped to handle RoRo ( Roll on-Roll off ) vessels that transport motor vehicles.
 
Erected 2009 by U.S. Dept. Of Transportation Federal Highway Administration,Georgia Dept. of Transportation. (Marker Number 9.)
 
Location. 32° 4.854′ N, 81° 5.233′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on East River Street, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. near Lincoln St. Ramp, Riverside. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Liquefied Natural Gas Ship as mentioned Photo, Click for full size
Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker
3. Liquefied Natural Gas Ship as mentioned
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Savannah's Wharves (a few steps from this marker); Christmas in Savannah 1864 (within shouting distance of this marker); Savannah Marine Korean War Monument (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Georgia Hussars (about 300 feet away); Savannah, Birthplace of Prince Hall Masonry in Georgia (about 300 feet away); Savannah's Cobblestones (about 400 feet away); Salzburger Monument of Reconciliation (about 400 feet away); Savannah's Irish and Robert Emmet Park (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Savannah.
 
Also see . . .  Port of Savannah and History. (Submitted on May 30, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
 
Categories. 20th CenturyIndustry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker Photo, Click for full size
Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker, 2009
4. Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker
Waving Girl of Savannah, greets incoming and outgoing ships into Savannah Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 24, 2009
5. Waving Girl of Savannah, greets incoming and outgoing ships into Savannah
Statue seen in lower center, as tanker arrives in port, with the tug, Gen. Oglethorp escorting
Port of Savannah Tug, as mentioned on Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
6. Port of Savannah Tug, as mentioned on Marker
The Gen. Oglrthorpe
Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker as a Container ship passes by Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
7. Shipping in the Port of Savannah Marker as a Container ship passes by
The first container ships carried about 2,500 TEUs (20-foot equivalent units). These ships grew in size until the first Post-Panamax ships arrived with beams in excess of 106 feet, too wide for the Panama Canal.
Shipping in the Port of Savannah , Ferry boat works the river along with a container ship Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
8. Shipping in the Port of Savannah , Ferry boat works the river along with a container ship
Savannah River Queen, scenic boat ride , works the waters Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
9. Savannah River Queen, scenic boat ride , works the waters
Stern-wheeler, as mentioned, dockside in Savannah Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, October 25, 2003
10. Stern-wheeler, as mentioned, dockside in Savannah
Port of Savannah Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 24, 2009
11. Port of Savannah
Shipping in the Port of Savannah , seen from top of Bay St., Savannah Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
12. Shipping in the Port of Savannah , seen from top of Bay St., Savannah
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,284 times since then and 74 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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