Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Clemson in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Golden Tigers and Class of 1942 Cadet Life Garden

 
 
Cadet Life Garden Marker -<br>Located on the East Base of the Guardroom Bell Structure Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
1. Cadet Life Garden Marker -
Located on the East Base of the Guardroom Bell Structure
Inscription.
The Cadet Life Garden
The Cadet Life Garden is dedicated to a special period in Clemson history. From its foundation until 1956, Clemson was an all-military college, one of seven in the nation. The student body was organized as a Corps of Cadets under a regular army Commandant. All students wore uniforms, attended military classes, practiced military drills, lived in barracks, marched to meals in a common mess hall, and most attended military summer camp at a US Army post - all the while working towards a college degree in their chosen field. Most were commissioned as officers in the US Army Reserve Corps on graduation, and many saw active duty with the military in foreign wars. During those sixty years, 12,314 students graduated, nearly 10,000 became Reserve Officers, about 5,600 saw active military service, and 335 died or were missing in action while fighting for their country.

Life as a cadet was far different from that of present-day students at Clemson. The purpose of this garden is to portray and explain the customers and traditions that were unique to cadet life.

The Guardroom and Guardroom Bell
Atop old No. 1 Barracks, high above the Guardroom three floors below, the Guardroom Bell was at the very center of cadet life. The Guardroom was always manned by cadets assigned by the
Guardroom and Guardroom Bell Marker -<br>Located on the West Base of the Guardroom Bell Structure Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
2. Guardroom and Guardroom Bell Marker -
Located on the West Base of the Guardroom Bell Structure
top cadet officers: two "rats" (freshmen) for running errands, the Corporal of the Guard (a sophomore), th Officer of the Guard and Officer of the Day (seniors). Their duties were to answer the only barracks telephone and to relay messages to cadets, to provide visitors with information and help, to maintain order, to ensure that the bugler sounded his calls on time, and to ring the Guardroom Bell for all formations and for the first class of the day.

All campus life marched to the tune of the Guardroom Bell, the same bell you see here. It was first rung in 1893 when the No. 1 Barracks was completed, and was deactivated in 1954 when No. 1 Barracks was razed to make room for modern new dormitories.

Clemson's Golden Tigers
Given to honor all those cadets
Attending Clemson Agricultural College
From 1893 to 1956
Who so well exemplify the Clemson Spirit.

Class of 1942
Given in memory of all Classmates
Who gave their Lives
In the Service of their Country.

 
Location. 34° 40.417′ N, 82° 49.417′ W. Marker is in Clemson, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker can be reached from Perimeter Road. Click for map. Markers are located on the grounds of the South Carolina Botanical Garden. Marker is at or near this postal address: 150 Discovery Lane, Clemson SC 29634, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Guardroom c. 1917 -<br>Located on the North Base of the Guardroom Bell Structure Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
3. The Guardroom c. 1917 -
Located on the North Base of the Guardroom Bell Structure
At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Heritage Gardens (within shouting distance of this marker); Heritage Gardens Entrance (within shouting distance of this marker); The T.L. Senn Horticultural Gardens (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Charles and Betty Cruickshank Hosta Garden (about 500 feet away); Hosta Garden Donors (about 500 feet away); Log House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hunt Cabin (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Camellia Garden (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dr. Luther W. Baxter (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Hayden Conference Center (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Clemson.
 
More about this marker. The Cadet Life Garden and Guardroom and Guardroom Bell markers are located on the Guardroom Bell display in the center of the garden. Surrounding the bell are plaques depicting scenes and traditions of cadet life. The Cadet Life Garden was designed by architect and designer Lolly Tai. The platform and Guardroom Bell Structure was a gift of the Class of 1955.
 
Also see . . .
1. SC Botanical Garden. The South Carolina Botanical Garden is a diverse 295 acres of natural landscapes, display gardens, and miles of streams and nature trails. (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
No. 1 Barracks c. 1917 -<br>Located on the South Base of the Guardroom Bell Structure Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
4. No. 1 Barracks c. 1917 -
Located on the South Base of the Guardroom Bell Structure
 

2. South Carolina Botanical Garden. The South Carolina Botanical Garden (295 acres) is located in Clemson, South Carolina on the campus of Clemson University. (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Clemson University. Official website of Clemson University. (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. The Corps. Army ROTC, Military Science, was established as an integral part of the academic curriculum of Clemson University beginning in 1893 with the institution's first full time academic year of operation. (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Clemson Corps. Since Clemson began classes in 1893, the value of a solid military force has been a major part of its education. (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Clemson Corps: The Fightin' Tiger Battalion Tiger Orange Book. Welcome to the Fightin’ Tiger Battalion and the best leadership training in the world! (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Thomas Green Clemson. Thomas Green Clemson, IV (July 1, 1807 – April 6, 1888) was an American politician and statesman, serving as an ambassador and the United States Superintendent of Agriculture. (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Golden Tigers Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
5. Golden Tigers Marker
 

8. Fort McClellan. Fort McClellan, originally Camp McClellan, was a United States Army installation located adjacent to the city of Anniston, Alabama. (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. The National Society of Scabbard and Blade. Scabbard and Blade is a joint service honor society that unites cadets and midshipmen from all over the country in military excellence. (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. Scabbard and Blade. Scabbard and Blade is a college military honor society founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1904. (Submitted on May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. University boasts military heritage
By John E. Robinson
The Tiger
October 4, 2002

While looking at the renovation of the Fraternity Quad at Clemson, it is important to remember that they are one of the last remnants of the old Cadet Corps. The Corps of Cadets at Clemson was a compulsory system that lasted from the opening of the College in 1893 to the reorganization of the College in 1955.

The story of the Corps is of a time that is past and a style of learning that is far different from what
Class of 1942 Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
6. Class of 1942 Marker
we experience today. For better and for worse, the Corps is an essential part of the Clemson that we attend today. The life of a Clemson cadet was a complex and rigorous one. Not only did Clemson students have to work hard in the classroom, but they were also expected to perform well in military drill and tactical instruction. The Corps way of life was introduced to students upon their arrival.

Freshmen were immediately labeled as "rats" by upperclassmen, and the first order of business was the shaving of the rats' heads. This was supposedly for de-lousing, but it also was a wake-up call to the unseasoned students that had arrived. Next came the unpacking of the possessions of upperclassmen and the assigning of "rat sergeants." This was a dubious honor, as the rat sergeants were assigned the duties of cleaning latrines and organizing the discipline of their own classmates.

Usually, upperclassmen selected a rat to be their personal attendant for their first year. Their duties included running errands, getting food for upperclassmen and keeping their superior's barracks in order. This was in addition to the common practice of hazing, which lasted throughout the freshman year.

In Frank Mellette's book, "Old Clemson College: It Was a Hell of a Place," the author lists some of the more common hazing practices. Running a gauntlet of leather belts held by upperclassmen,
Golden Tigers and Class of 1942 Cadet Life Garden Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
7. Golden Tigers and Class of 1942 Cadet Life Garden Marker
Located at the foot of the steps leading into the garden.
being hit with soap bars wrapped in a towel, and "tipping" were common forms of hazing. The last practice consisted of sneaking into a cadet's room at night and flipping his mattress off the frame and upside-down, so that the occupant was dumped into the floor. The hazing of cadets reflected the harsh realities of their world, but they also were considered rites of passage that marked the transition of cadets from mere rats to Clemson men.

Barracks life made for a long day. Reveille was at dawn, and breakfast was as early as 6 a.m. In fact, in Clemson's early years, class was often finished in the morning hours, so that drill could be held in the afternoons. Lunch and dinner were served, and curfew was in effect so that the night started early and all cadets were accounted for. There was an incessant wave of cadets at any given time on detail, and Clemson cadet parades from this period were spectacular in both their professionalism and their school spirit. This tradition continues to the present with both Thursday ROTC drill and the annual pass-in-review by the entire ROTC program.

The only dorms that housed cadets at Clemson that stand today are Johnstone A and the buildings in the Quad. The Quad was built in stages throughout the 1930s, and most of Johnstone was completed by the early 1950s. Upon entering these buildings, one might notice the width of the halls
Guardroom Bell Structure South -<br>From the Jame Morgan Avinger Memorial Walkway Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
8. Guardroom Bell Structure South -
From the Jame Morgan Avinger Memorial Walkway
Given by Henry C. Avinger '39, in loving memory of his wife, Jane. Mother of Harry, Jr., Marguerite and Jim.
and many of the doorways. This was necessary to allow the companies to form in their respective hallways and then march out as a group in formation. These Companies were in size by platoons and then battalions.

The battalion commanders were the most disciplined students on campus, and they earned their ranks through years of dedication. The commanders reported in turn to a commandant, who was a member of the active personnel of the U.S. Army. Commandants came and went with time, but their individual character was instrumental in student life. Particularly harsh commandants, J.C. Minus and Otis Cole, were both partially responsible for student riots or walkouts during their tenures. Others, such as T.Q. Donaldson, were considered fathers to the cadets and were trusted advisors.

Clemson was founded with the primary purposes of teaching agriculture, engineering and military science. For many years, these remained the staples of a Clemson education, but by the time of World War II, the Corps of Cadets was considered unpopular and outdated, especially when Clemson student life was compared to that of other schools. With the Cresap, McCormick and Padget Plan of 1954, it was determined that the Corps should be ended to make way for a coed school that could offer more degrees and a better education.

But as any old Corps Cadet will testify, the Clemson Corps
Guardroom Bell Structure - North<br>From the Carol Marie McLeod Memorial Walkway Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
9. Guardroom Bell Structure - North
From the Carol Marie McLeod Memorial Walkway
Given by Benjamin F. McLeod '39 in loving memory of his wife Carol. Mother of Ben III, Thomas and Scott.
provided a one-of-a-kind education that they treasured for life. It is fitting, therefore, that the bonds between students built in the halls of the Quad should be continued by students today in a new, revamped atmosphere.
    — Submitted May 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. EducationMilitaryNotable Places
 
Guardroom Bell Structure -<br>Northeast Corner<br>Cadet Life and Guardroom Plaques Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
10. Guardroom Bell Structure -
Northeast Corner
Cadet Life and Guardroom Plaques
Guardroom Bell Structure -<br>Southwest Corner<br>Guardroom Bell & No 1 Barracks Plaques Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
11. Guardroom Bell Structure -
Southwest Corner
Guardroom Bell & No 1 Barracks Plaques
Guardroom Bell Structure North -<br>Caboose Garden in the Distance Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
12. Guardroom Bell Structure North -
Caboose Garden in the Distance
Cadet Life Garden Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
13. Cadet Life Garden
The centerpiece is the Guardroom Bell Tower Structure. Surrounding the bell are scenes depicting cadet life.
Cadet Life Garden - Registration Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
14. Cadet Life Garden - Registration
They came from far and near, and on arriving at Clemson for the first time new students queued up here at Tillman Hall, with returning cadets ("old boys") to register and themselves officially become Clemson Cadets. Clothing worn in the communities from which they came would soon be replaced by the cadet uniform. Their various hairstyles would also be modified to something more fitting to their status as lowly freshman "rats" of "new boys."
Cadet Life Garden - The Shearing Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
15. Cadet Life Garden - The Shearing
A tradition since 1923, at registration time upperclassmen (especially sophomores) gleefully - and for a fee - helped freshmen get rid of their hair. In many cases the aid of a professional barber was then needed to repair the damage and give new students that clean shaved look required of all freshmen. This uniformly bald condition lasted only until a new crop of hair was grow - but even then, as with all cadets, only conservative hair styles were allowed.
Cadet Life Garden - Uniforms Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
16. Cadet Life Garden - Uniforms
Supply room personnel issued regulation uniforms to all cadets. Careful measurements were taken and the necessary alterations were made by an in-house tailor. Cadets had to pay for their uniforms, but the cost was included as part of the tuition fee. The uniform which underwent several changes through the years, would become their normal wear and serve as a means of identification of Clemson men throughout their college years - especially as they "thumbed" their way on weekend leave.
Cadet Life Garden - Training Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
17. Cadet Life Garden - Training
Because the military played such a dominant role in the life of Clemson cadets, the training of freshmen began soon after registration. For several weeks, very intensive instruction in military posture, proper dress, commands, movements, and the manual of arms was given to all new cadets in small groups of usually eight-men squads. The training was conducted by upperclassmen under the close supervision of senior officers, shown here on the quadrangle with Tillman Hall at right.
Cadet Life Garden - Keeping Fit Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
18. Cadet Life Garden - Keeping Fit
Calisthenics was part of the routine for all cadets. The first formation of the day, Reveille, was held outdoors whenever the weather permitted. Al Reveille, cadets answered roll call, stood at attention, as they flag was raised, and then often formed up for a regimen of calisthenics led by junior or senior cadet officers. After exercise, they returned to barrack to clean up and prepare for the breakfast formation and after-breakfast classes.
Cadet Life Garden - Discipline Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
19. Cadet Life Garden - Discipline
Freshmen were assigned to upperclassmen to serve as orderlies throughout their first year. This daily service included cleaning rooms, making beds, and running errands of all kinds. Inadequate attention to these duties resulted in discipline - usually, as here, administered with a broom or paddle. Occasionally all the "rats" on a company hall would undergo mass disciple - events called "pep meetings" - by upperclassmen armed with paddles, coat hangers and those dreaded long-handled brooms.
Cadet Life Garden - Mess Hall Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
20. Cadet Life Garden - Mess Hall
For many years the huge mess hall on the bottom floor of 1st Barracks accommodated the entire Cadet Corps at a single seating. Cadets marched to meals and took their assigned seating. Cadets marched to meals and took their assigned seats by Companies. The table arrangement usually involved a senior cadet officer at the head, a junior officer at the foot, and four cadets on each of the two sides. It was only after the orders of the day were read and the meal was blessed that paid cadet waiters served the food family style.
Cadet Life Garden - Ice Cream Hoax Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
21. Cadet Life Garden - Ice Cream Hoax
At a noon meal early in the school year it would be announced over the mess hall loudspeaker that the ice cream machinery had broken down and free ice cream was available to early arrivals at the old Dairy Building. Freshmen (urged by upperclassmen) left the mess hall in mass with every kind of container imaginable, and arrived to learn that it was all nothing but a hoax. Sometimes they returned to find and "pool" whomever had made the announcement. The hoax worked year after year. Even the occasional sophomore joined the rush to the dairy.
Cadet Life Garden - Room Inspection Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
22. Cadet Life Garden - Room Inspection
Each Sunday morning cadet officers, occasionally accompanied by members of the permanent military staff, thoroughly inspected each barracks room. They checked for cleanliness, properly made beds, clean rifles, orderly footlockers, and also that cadets themselves were neat, clean and properly attired. Infractions resulted in demerits - enough of which could lead to loss of privileges or even expulsion from college. If an upperclassman received demerits, woe to his freshman orderly.
Class of 1942 Memorial Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
23. Class of 1942 Memorial
In honor of the members of the Class of 1942
who made the supreme sacrifice
in the service of our country.
They died for us, that we would never know the loss of freedom;
that the values they held dear would live on.
We, their classmates, thank them for their sacrifices; celebrate their lives, and pledge to keep the faith - that their deaths shall not have been in vain.
Cadet Life Garden - Mail Call Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
24. Cadet Life Garden - Mail Call
The limited number of boxes in the campus post office could not accommodate the entire student body, and so a daily "mail call" took place - seen here in 1938 from the balcony of 2nd Barracks. Freshmen were sent to pick up mail from the upperclassmen to whom they were assigned, as well as for themselves. In later years, "rats" were sent to the new campus post office, sometimes several times a day, for the mail. This was one of the many services freshmen were required to perform in their "rat" year.
Cadet Life Garden - Formations Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
25. Cadet Life Garden - Formations
The cadet's day began with Reveille at 6:30 a.m., and ended with Taps at 11 p.m. Each event was signaled by a bugle call, the guardroom bell, or a public address system announcement. The last outdoor formation of the day, Retreat (seen here in front of the 2nd Barracks), preceded the evening meal and featured the retirement of the colors. At 8:30 p.m. all cadets except seniors formed in their barracks' halls for "Long Roll" - to assure that all were present or accounted for.
Cadet Life Garden - Weekend Leave Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
26. Cadet Life Garden - Weekend Leave
Thought freshmen had few weekends off, upperclassmen could leave the campus most weekends unless under certain demerit or class restrictions. There were few personal cars, but "thumbing" provided the means of transit. A usual Saturday scene was an orderly queue of cadets, shown here in front of Sikes Hall (then the library), with thumbs extended. It was understood that all lined up in the order of their arrival - first to get there, first to get a ride.
Class of 1942 Officers Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
27. Class of 1942 Officers
Clemson Agricultural College
Class of 1942
Class Officers
President: Julian D. Dunsenbury
Vice-President: C.B. "Buddy" Lesesne
Secretary-Treasurer: Bonum S. Sams
Historian: Larry W. Coker
Pro Tem Officers
President: Thomas C. Breazeale
Class Executive Committee: James W. Barton, Thomas C. Breazeale, J.C. "Mike" Hubbard, J. Givens Young
Cadet Life Garden - Summer Camp Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
28. Cadet Life Garden - Summer Camp
Military training, both in classroom and on the drill field, was compulsory for all cadets. At the end of their junior year, qualified cadets attended a six-week summer camp at a regular U.S. Army post for field instruction under U.S. Army personnel. This was a requirement for receiving a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Reserves. Fort McClellan (seen here), located near Anniston, Alabama, was one of the summer training sites.
Cadet Life Garden - Parade Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
29. Cadet Life Garden - Parade
Several times during the year, the entire Corps of Cadets assembled on the quadrangles and marched to Bowman Field for a formal full-dress parade and/or inspection. Favorites were the Mother's Day parade near Easter, and the traditional moonlight parade later in the school year. On occasion the Corps was reviewed by visiting dignitaries, such as congressmen, governors and sometimes even presidents. Large crowds often gathered on the grounds across the highway to view these ceremonies.
Cadet Life Garden - Senior Parade Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
30. Cadet Life Garden - Senior Parade
The fancy drill platoons began in the freshman year and carried through to the senior year. Tryouts began early in the school year. The best drilled cadets were chosen for the platoons. Participation was optional but competition for a position in the platoons was very keen, especially for the Senior Platoon. The Senior Platoon, featuring precision drilling, often put on exhibitions between the halves at football games as seen here, and at other special events throughout the country.
Cadet Life Garden - Honorary Cadet Colonel Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
31. Cadet Life Garden - Honorary Cadet Colonel
Sponsored by Scabbard & Blade, an honorary military fraternity, the annual Military Ball featured the naming of a young lady as the Corps' Honorary Cadet Colonel, and highlighted the military social life. The ball was among the most popular of the Central Dance Association's monthly big band dances. Later in the year the honorary Cadet Colonel, clad in her resplendent white uniform, reviewed the Cadet Corps at a parade on Bowman Field or sometimes, as seen here, on Riggs Field.
Cadet Life Garden - Commissioning Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
32. Cadet Life Garden - Commissioning
After four years of disciplined cadet life, intensive military training, summer camp at a U.S. Army military reservation, and successful completion of all academic requirements for graduation, eligible cadets were commissioned as 2nd Lieutenants in the U.S. Armed Forces Reserve Corps. Until World War II, this final ritual took place at the time of the academic graduation exercises, and usually included a great majority of the senior class.
Cadet Life Garden - The Clemson Spirit Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 10, 2009
33. Cadet Life Garden - The Clemson Spirit
Though the cadet uniform went through many changes, one constant has been that very real Clemson Spirit. It was born in and nurtured by Clemson's military years, and has flourished through the great changes that have since taken place. The Clemson Spirit is a feeling among alumni of being connected by invisible bonds to classmates, to other alumni, and to their alma mater. It expresses itself in an instructive camaraderie toward other Clemson folk, in a sense of pride in the school, and in a never-ending desire to make Clemson a better place for those who follow in their footsteps. May it ever be thus.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,158 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement