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Chesterfield in Chesterfield County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Chesterfield Court House

Soldiers and Refugees

 

—Lee’s Retreat —

 
Chesterfield Court House CWT Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 30, 2009
1. Chesterfield Court House CWT Marker
Inscription. Late on the morning of Monday, April 3, 1865, part of Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia briefly halted here at the Chesterfield County seat. The day before, a series of Federal attacks had broken through Lee’s lines at Petersburg and ended the siege there. Lee ordered his army to withdraw from the Richmond-Petersburg fronts. The last of the Confederates came off the line that night when the moon went down. A member of the 12th Virginia Infantry on picket duty outside Petersburg later wrote, “I’ll never see the calm moon again without remembering this sad night.”

The army withdrew in four columns, three through Chesterfield County and one through Dinwiddie County, to reunite at Amelia Court House south of the Appomattox River. Gen. William Mahone’s troops were ordered to “Take the road to Chesterfield Court House, thence to old Colville to Goode’s Bridge [on the Appomattox River north of Amelia Court House].” After arriving here, a line of battle was formed “to resist a dash which was expected from the enemy but never made,” the picket recalled. Resuming the march, Mahone’s column camped that night on Captain Flournoy’s farm. A soldier wrote of the day’s march, “I am all right and not half so demoralized as I imagined. Feel much better than last night. We
Route of Lee's Retreat and the Union pursuit. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 30, 2009
2. Route of Lee's Retreat and the Union pursuit.
Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia took the routes indicated in red. Lee followed the solid red route. The Union Army of the Potomac took the roads indicated in blue.
have resolved to fight them to the bitter end.” The next morning the column marched to Goode’s Bridge.

(sidebar)
“The Division reached Chesterfield C.H. in the fore noon of that Monday morning the third day of April. …We found the court house ground ... crowded with all manner of vehicles and women with their children - who had fled mainly from Petersburg. … A halt was made … and the troops given an opportunity to breakfast while I busied myself in bringing off and away such military wagons as had reached that place and the retreating caravan of vehicles and folks.” - Gen. William Mahone
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 37° 22.573′ N, 77° 30.416′ W. Marker is in Chesterfield, Virginia, in Chesterfield County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Iron Bridge Road (Virginia Route 10) and Wagners Way. Click for map. This CWT panel is located on the lawn in front of the 1917 Courthouse building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10021 Iron Bridge Road, Chesterfield VA 23832, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Chesterfield County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Apostles of Religious Liberty
Chesterfield County 1917 Courthouse Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 30, 2009
3. Chesterfield County 1917 Courthouse
(within shouting distance of this marker); Magnolia Grange (within shouting distance of this marker); Pocahontas State Park (approx. 3.7 miles away); Civilian Conservation Corps - Company 2386 (approx. 4 miles away); CCC Camp Site (approx. 4 miles away); Dividends for the Future (approx. 4.2 miles away); Drewry’s Bluff Defences (approx. 4.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Chesterfield.
 
More about this marker. On the upper center panel is a photograph of the original courthouse with the caption, “Chesterfield County Courthouse, ca. 1750, as it appeared early in the 20th century with a late-19th-century porch. The courthouse was demolished in 1916, then reconstructed in 1977, a few yards north of the original location.” Courtesy Chesterfield County Historical Society

On the upper right is a photograph of “Gen. William Mahone” Courtesy Library of Congress

On the lower right is a map showing the route of Lee’s retreat and the Union pursuit. The caption reads, "Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia took
Chesterfield County Museum housed in a reconstruction of the 1750 Courthouse. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 31, 2009
4. Chesterfield County Museum housed in a reconstruction of the 1750 Courthouse.
the routes indicated in red. Lee followed the solid red route. The Union Army of the Potomac took the roads indicated in blue."
 
Also see . . .
1. Civil War Traveler - Central Virginia: Richmond and Area. Chesterfield County Museum and Lee’s Retreat marker. (Submitted on June 1, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Chesterfield Historical Society. Historic Sites. (Submitted on June 1, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Chesterfield and Manchester Confederate Memorial Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, May 30, 2009
5. Chesterfield and Manchester Confederate Memorial
(front) 1861 In memory of the Confederate soldiers of Chesterfield and Manchester 1865; (rear) Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori [it is sweet and seemly to die for one's country]
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,386 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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