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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

City Hall

 
 
City Hall Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brandon Fletcher, October 9, 2011
1. City Hall Marker
Inscription.
This building, designed by
Gabriel Manigault
and built in 1801 for the
Charleston branch of
The First Bank of the United States,
Stands upon the site which was set
apart as a market place in 1672
and used for that purpose until
1796 when the old "Beef Market",
as the place was then known, was
destroyed by fire...purchased
by the city in 1818, it has been
occupied as the City Hall since
that time. . . . . . . . . . .

 
Erected 1938 by The City of Charleston.
 
Location. 32° 46.596′ N, 79° 55.855′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is at the intersection of Broad Street and Meeding Street, on the right when traveling west on Broad Street. Click for map. Marker is mounted on the building to the left of the far left “port hole” window. Marker is at or near this postal address: 80 Broad Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. County of Charleston Historic Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); St Michael's Episcopal Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Henry Timrod
City Hall Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
2. City Hall Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Blake Tenements (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named County of Charleston Historic Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named County of Charleston Historic Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); St. Michael's Church (within shouting distance of this marker); George Washington Statue (within shouting distance of this marker); Major General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. Post Office and Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Charleston City Hall. Charleston's City Hall building was constructed between 1800 and 1804 in the Adamesque style. In 1800 the City Council conveyed this parcel to the Federal government for the purpose of erecting "an elegant building" that would serve as a branch of The First Bank of the United States. (Submitted on June 3, 2009.) 

2. Gabriel Manigault
City Hall Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
3. City Hall Marker
. Gabriel Manigault (March 17, 1758 – November 4, 1809) was an American architect. (Submitted on October 3, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. First Bank of the United States. The First Bank was a bank chartered by the United States Congress on February 25, 1791. (Submitted on October 3, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Four Corners of Law
The U.S. Post office and Courthouse sits at the intersection of Broad Street and Meeting Street in Charleston. It is one of four structures at this intersection commonly referred to as the "Four Corners of Law". St. Michael's Episcopal Church, built between 1752 and 1761, represents God's law. The Charleston County Courthouse, built in 1792, represents county law. The Charleston City Hall, built in 1802, represents city law. The U.S. Post Office and Court House, built in 1896, represents federal law.
    — Submitted February 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Colonial EraGovernmentNotable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
Charleston City Hall Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
4. Charleston City Hall
City Hall Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Sean Nix, February 12, 2010
5. City Hall
Bank of the United States image, Click for more information
By C.O. Greene, Photographer, circa March 1939
6. Bank of the United States
Charleston's City Hall is significant for many reasons. First, it is important for its original, graceful architectural design and its perfect execution of detail. It fits nobly into a highly distinguished group of early American public buildings. The United States Banks in Philadelphia, designed respectively by Samuel Blodgett and William Strickland, the Branch Banks, notably Bulfinch's work in Boston, William Jay's in Savannah, and Martin Thompson's in New York, make a splendid company. They were, and in their time so recognized, highly successful examples of architectural erudition, good design and scale suitable to the thriving cities of the new republic...
HABS SC,10-CHAR,108
Click for more information.
Charleston City Hall Photo, Click for full size
By C.O. Greene, Photographer, circa March 1938
7. Charleston City Hall
Southwest View
HABS SC,10-CHAR,108
Charleston City Hall Photo, Click for full size
By C.O. Greene, Photographer, circa March 1939
8. Charleston City Hall
Side and Rear View – West and North
HABS SC,10-CHAR,108
Charleston City Hall Engraving<br>Showing Original Brick Exterior Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, circa 1875
9. Charleston City Hall Engraving
Showing Original Brick Exterior
Charleston City Hall<br>Southeast Corner Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, circa 1895
10. Charleston City Hall
Southeast Corner
Charleston City Hall<br>Meeting Street (West) Facade Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
11. Charleston City Hall
Meeting Street (West) Facade
Charleston City Hall<br>Broad Street (South) Facade Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
12. Charleston City Hall
Broad Street (South) Facade
Charleston City Hall<br>Broad Street (South) Facade<br>From West Corner of Meeting and Broad Streets Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
13. Charleston City Hall
Broad Street (South) Facade
From West Corner of Meeting and Broad Streets
City Hall and Charleston's Motto: Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2011
14. City Hall and Charleston's Motto:
Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She Guards Her Buildings, Customs, and Laws)
Corpus Politicum (the body of the customary laws)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 892 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   2. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   14. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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