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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Maumee in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fallen Timbers

 
 
Fallen Timbers Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Dale K. Benington, May 12, 2009
1. Fallen Timbers Marker
Inscription. Resentment by the Indians against white encroachment reached a peck in the 1790ís. Encouraged by the British, they began to raid settlements. Two poorly organized American military campaigns, led by General Josiah Harmar in 1790 and Governor Arthur St. Clair in 1791, were soundly defeated by the Indians. President Washington turned to Anthony Wayne to crush Indian resistance.

Wayne assembled troops at Cincinnati, then moved to Fort Greene Ville where he spent many months creating a disciplined, well-trained army. By summer 1794, he was ready to move.

On the march to the Maumee Valley, Wayne met nearly 2,000 Indians here at a grove of trees felled by a tornado. After hard fighting, Wayne drove the Indians to the gates of nearby Fort Miamis, where he defeated them.

In the Treaty of Greene Ville, signed in 1795, the Indians surrendered their claims to most of Ohio. The treaty pacified the frontier for fifteen years and opened Ohio to peaceful settlement.
 
Erected 1978 by The Ohio Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Indian Wars Battlefield Trails, and the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 41° 32.64′ N, 83° 41.849′ W. Marker is near Maumee
Fallen Timbers Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Dale K. Benington, May 12, 2009
2. Fallen Timbers Marker
, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker is on Fallen Timbers Lane half a mile north of U.S. 24, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. This marker is located about a mile southwest of the intersection of US 23 and US 24, just off of US 24 at the Fallen Timbers Lane exit, almost midway between the villages of Maumee and Waterville, Ohio. Marker is in this post office area: Maumee OH 43537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Fallen Timbers (a few steps from this marker); American Indians at the Battle of Fallen Timbers (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fallen Timbers Battle Memorial (about 300 feet away); Turkey Foot Rock (about 300 feet away); Fallen Timbers Battle Monument (about 300 feet away); Maumee River Rapids (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fighting Forces (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fallen Timbers Battlefield (approx. 0.4 miles away but has been reported missing). Click for a list of all markers in Maumee.
 
More about this marker. This monument is located in Fallen Timbers State Park, between US 24 and the Maumee River.
 
Regarding Fallen Timbers. The Battle of Fallen Timbers State Memorial has long been assumed to be the site of one of the most important battles in American history. Yet recently, in 1995, Dr. G. Michael Pratt,
Fallen Timbers Battlield Memorial Photo, Click for full size
By Dale K. Benington, May 12, 2009
3. Fallen Timbers Battlield Memorial
an anthropologist and faculty member at Heidelberg College, conducted an archaeological survey (using metal detectors) in a farm field about a mile to the north, north, west of the state memorial and discovered a significant number of metal battlefield artifacts, dating back to the late 1700s, and changed everyone's mind. It is now believed that the focal point of the Battle of Fallen Timbers, took place in a farm field, that is located just down the road, at the northwest corner of the intersection of US 24 and US 23/I-475 in Maumee, Ohio.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Fallen Timbers. This link is published and made available by, the Metroparks of the Toledo Area. It includes information both about the battle and information about the battlefield today. (Submitted on June 2, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Battle of Fallen Timbers. This link is published and made available by, "Ohio History Central," an online encyclopedia of Ohio History. (Submitted on June 2, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Battle of Fallen Timbers. This web link was both published and made available by, "Touring Ohio." (Submitted on June 2, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNative AmericansNotable EventsWars, US Indian
 
Fallen Timbers Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Dale K. Benington, April 20, 2011
4. Fallen Timbers Marker
View of a painting of the Battle of Fallen Timbers that is on display across the Maumee River at the Fort Meigs Visitor Center.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,525 times since then and 101 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   4. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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