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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Trinity Church

Exploring Downtown

 
 
Trinity Church Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
1. Trinity Church Marker
Inscription. Trinity was founded as the Church of England’s parish church for colonial New York, and its charter issued in 1697 by King William III, appointed as rector the Lord Bishop of London. Despite Trinity’s Royal beginnings, however, the church’s later parishioners included several members of the first and second Continental Congresses, along with Francis Lewis – a signer of the Declaration of Independence – who is buried in the churchyard.

After the Revolutionary War, Trinity donated land for new streets to help rebuild a shattered New York. Street names reflecting the church’s presence include Vestry, Rector and Church, as well as Vesey and Barclay (named for two of Trinity’s early rectors) – and, of course Trinity Place. In that same spirit, Trinity Church has made countless contributions to New York’s well-being, including social programs for 19th-century immigrants, Depression-era soup kitchens and shelters for today’s homeless.

The first Trinity Church building perished in the Great Fire of 1776. Following the demolition of its successor in 1839, Trinity engaged English-born architect Richard Upjohn, who imagined the new Trinity as an idyllic English Gothic country church – his rendering shown above reveals no hint of Trinity’s location at one of the city’s busiest intersections.

Today, Trinity
Marker on Broadway Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
2. Marker on Broadway
ranks as one of the finest Gothic Revival church buildings in America. Inside, Trinity shelters a treasure-house of 19th century religious art, including enormous bronze doors modeled after those of Ghiberti in the Baptistry in Florence, and the stunning blue and red stained-glass chancel window. Outside, churchyard monuments honor the memory of notable New Yorkers buried here, including first Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, steamship pioneer Robert Fulton, and William Bradford, founder of New York’s first newspaper, the New York Gazette.
 
Erected by The Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks, and the Signers of the Declaration of Independence marker series.
 
Location. 40° 42.47′ N, 74° 0.702′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Broadway and Wall Street, on the right when traveling south on Broadway. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10006, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Trinity Church (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Trinity Church (a few steps from this marker); The American Institute of Architects
Trinity Church Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
3. Trinity Church
(a few steps from this marker); Queen Elizabeth II (a few steps from this marker); The Wall (a few steps from this marker); Site of the Wall of New Amsterdam (a few steps from this marker); New York State Society of the Cincinnati (within shouting distance of this marker); Captain James Lawrence & Lieutenant Augustus C. Ludlow (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker. The top right of the marker features a “Birds-eye view of Trinity Church by Richard Upjohn, 1847” which depicts it as an English Gothic country church. The left of the marker contains a picture of King William III, whose “charter mandated that the Vestry of Trinity Church pay rent of ‘one pepper-corne’ annually to the Crown.” Next to this is a picture of Britain's reigning monarch with the caption “When Queen Elizabeth II visited Trinity Church during the American Bicentennial in 1976, the Vestry’s Dr. Robert Ray Parks presented her with 279 peppercorns in back rent.” Below these are two photographs. One is of an African woman and has
Trinity Church from the Churchyard Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
4. Trinity Church from the Churchyard
a caption of “Trinity Church is one of the country’s oldest and largest philanthropies, with a history of local and international grantmaking that dates back to the early 1700s. Trinity’s international grantees include development management training programs for African women who produce most of their families’ food.” Also present is a photograph of the front doors of the church, with the caption “The Astor Memorial doors, designed by architect Richard Morris Hunt, with sculptors Karl Bitter, J. Massey Rhind, and Charles Niehaus, remain one of New York’s finest works of American religious art.”
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Take a tour of the markers in lower Manhattan erected by the Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Also see . . .  Trinity Church. Burned During War, Trinity is Home to Monuments, Hamilton Grave. New York Freedom Trail website. (Submitted on June 5, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
National Historic Landmark Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
5. National Historic Landmark Marker
Trinity Church and Graveyard
has been designated a
National Historic Landmark.
This site possesses National significance
in commemorating the history of the
United States of America.
1977
National Park Service
United States Department of the Interior
Grave of Francis Lewis Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
6. Grave of Francis Lewis
Francis Lewis, 1713-1803, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and a Vestryman of Trinity Church.
Trinity Churchyard Graves Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
7. Trinity Churchyard Graves
The churchyard of Trinity Church contains the graves of Alexander Hamilton (left) and Robert Fulton (right with flags).
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 749 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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