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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

1 Wall Street / 14 Wall Street

Exploring Downtown

 
 
1 Wall Street / 14 Wall Street Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
1. 1 Wall Street / 14 Wall Street Marker
Inscription.
1 Wall Street
On one of the world’s most expensive corners – 1 Wall Street and Broadway – architect Ralph Walker conceived his zig-zag Art Deco skyscraper for the Irving Trust Company as a “curtain wall” – not the typical sheet of glass hanging from a steel cage, but a limestone wall rippling like a curtain descending on a Broadway stage.

Because of the curves in the wall, the bank doesn’t completely occupy its full building lot, and by law unoccupied and unmarked land reverts to the public – not too many square inches are left unused here, but each one is worth gold. So a slender metal line in the sidewalk makes clear who owns what.

14 Wall Street
The Mausoleum of Halicarnassus piled on top of the bell-tower of St. Mark’s in Venice, at the corner of Wall and Broad – that’s the design concept behind 14 Wall Street. In its day the world’s tallest bank building, the 539-foot-high skyscraper originally housed the headquarters of Bankers Trust, one of the country’s wealthiest financial institutions.

Many early skyscrapers took the Venetian bell-tower as a logical model for a modern office tower, but 14 Wall Street was the first to top it off with a temple in the sky, a seven-story stepped pyramid modeled on one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.
Marker in Downtown New York Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
2. Marker in Downtown New York
Federal Hall, where George Washington was sworn in as the first president, can be seen in the background across the street from the marker.
The bank then adopted the pyramid as its trademark, and took as its slogan “A Tower of Strength.”

Instantly a standard-bearer in the fabled Downtown skyline, 14 Wall Street went on to become a widely recognized symbol of Wall Street and American capitalism.
 
Erected by The Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Location. 40° 42.435′ N, 74° 0.645′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Wall Street and Broad Street, on the left when traveling east on Wall Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. J. P. Morgan (a few steps from this marker); J.P. Morgan Building (a few steps from this marker); City Hall to U.S.Capitol / Money Men / Nassau Changes Scale (a few steps from this marker); Ohio Company of Associates (a few steps from this marker); On this site in Federal Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Let Freedom Ring (within shouting distance of this marker); Federal Hall National Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); New York Stock Exchange (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker.
Wall Street in Lower Manhattan Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
3. Wall Street in Lower Manhattan
This photo looks west, towards Broadway. The marker can be seen to the right of the crowded street. Trinity Church is visible at the end of Wall Street.
Several photographs appear on the marker, with captions of “The Wall Street entrance of 1 Wall Street leads into a dazzling, two-story banking hall whose ceiling sparkles in red and gold mosaics designed by Hildreth Meiore, rivaling the mosaics in the Golden Hall of Stockholm’s City Hall, and manufactured by the same company, the Revenna Mosaic Company in Berlin.” Other pictures are of The Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, and Wall Street from the roof of the Irving Trust Company Building, 1 Wall Street.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Take a tour of the markers in lower Manhattan erected by the Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,031 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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