Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charlottesville, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

President Monroe’s Local Homes

 
 
President Monroe’s Local Homes Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
1. President Monroe’s Local Homes Marker
Inscription. In 1789 James Monroe moved to Charlottesville and for one year his home was located in the first block west of this site. Then he lived for nine years in the home he built on what is now called “Monroe Hill” at the University of Virginia. His final Albemarle home, near “Monticello” was his “Highland” estate, now called “Ash Lawn.”
 
Location. 38° 1.824′ N, 78° 28.686′ W. Marker is in Charlottesville, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of 5th Street NE and East Market Street, on the left when traveling south on 5th Street NE. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 502 E. Market St., Charlottesville VA 22902, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Stone Tavern and Central Hotel (within shouting distance of this marker); The Three Notch’d Road (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Monticello (about 400 feet away); Albemarle Confederate Monument (about 400 feet away); Watering Fountains (about 400 feet away); Paul Goodloe McIntire (about 500 feet away); Historic Courthouse Square (about 500 feet away); Site of Old Swan Tavern (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Charlottesville.
 
Related marker.
President Monroe’s Local Homes Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 15, 2008
2. President Monroe’s Local Homes Marker
It is on the patio of the Tastings of Charlottesville Restaurant under one of the outside-seating umbrellas.
Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Monroe’s first house was later a tavern then a hotel, and finally a Civil War hospital when it burned down.
 
Also see . . .
1. Monroe Hill National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. “Monroe Hill originated as a small dwelling and law office built for James Monroe in 1790. Monroe occupied the property only briefly and sold the land to John Perry in 1814. Perry, one of the builders of the University of Virginia, enlarged the main house and eventually sold the property to the University. The main dwelling served as home of the proctor of the University for a time, but eventually came to be used for student use. Two arcaded ranges, each with six student rooms, were built in 1848 and the site became a residential college for students given grants by the Commonwealth of Virginia to attend the University. Monroe Hill continues to be used for educational purposes as a residential college, now known as Brown College.” (Submitted on June 10, 2009.) 

2. Virtual Tour of Ash Lawn - Highland. “Although Monroe’s house appears on its north elevation to be only one story high, the west elevation shows that the home was built into a hillside, which shelters the lower-level kitchen and other basement rooms from inclement weather. Additional shelter and beauty are provided by innumerable white ash trees, which abound
Site of Monroe Hill image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, July 2, 2011
3. Site of Monroe Hill
The original farm house has been expanded and enlarged over the years. Now it is the center of Brown College on Monroe Hill at the University of Virginia. The original law office (1790) remains at the left end of the walkway.
on the estate and stretch across the northwest lawn toward Carter's Mountain, where the southern ridge now marks Ash Lawn-Highland's boundary.” (Submitted on June 10, 2009.) 

3. Ash Lawn - National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. (Submitted on May 1, 2011, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Notable PersonsNotable Places
 
Ash Lawn – Highland (1799) image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, April 30, 2011
4. Ash Lawn – Highland (1799)
Ash Lawn - Highland (located near Simeon) is one of almost two dozen National Register of Historic Places located within the Southern Albemarle Rural Historic District. Built in 1799, it was the estate of James Monroe, the fifth President of the United States.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,057 times since then and 96 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement